Wikimedia Chapters Planet

September 13, 2014

Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Research Newsletter, August 2014

Wikimedia Research Newsletter
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Vol: 4 • Issue: 8 • August 2014 [contribute] [archives] Syndicate the Wikimedia Research Newsletter feed

A Wikipedia-based Pantheon; new Wikipedia analysis tool suite; how AfC hamstrings newbies

With contributions by: Federico Leva, Piotr Konieczny, Maximilian Klein, and Pine

Wikipedia in all languages used to rank global historical figures of all time

A research group at MIT led by Cesar A. Hidalgo published[1] a global “Pantheon” (probably the same project already mentioned in our December 2012 issue), where Wikipedia biographies are used to identify and “score” thousands of global historical figures of all time, together with a previous compilation of persons having written sources about them. The work was also covered in several news outlets. We won’t summarise here all the details, strengths and limits of their method, which can already be found in the well-written document above.

Many if not most of the headaches encountered by the research group lie in the work needed to aggregate said scores by geographical areas. It’s easy to get the city of birth of a person from Wikipedia, but it’s hard to tell to what ancient or modern country that city corresponds, for any definition of “country”. (Compare our recent review of a related project by a different group of researchers that encountered the same difficulties: “Interactions of cultures and top people of Wikipedia from ranking of 24 language editions”.) The MIT research group has to manually curate a local database; in an ideal world, they’d just fetch from Wikidata via an API. Aggregation by geographical area, for this and other reasons, seems of lesser interest than the place-agnostic person rank.

The most interesting point is that a person is considered historically relevant when being the subject of an article on 25 or more editions of Wikipedia. This method of assessing an article’s importance is often used by editors, but only as an unscientific approximation. It’s a useful finding that it proved valuable for research as well, though with acknowledged issues. The study is also one of the rare times researchers bother to investigate Wikipedia in all languages at the same time and we hope there will be follow-ups. For instance, it could be interesting to know which people with an otherwise high “score” were not included due to the 25+ languages filter, which could then be further tweaked based on the findings. As an example of possible distortions, Wikipedia has a dozen subdomains for local languages of Italy, but having an article in 10 italic languages is not an achievement of “global” coverage more than having 1.

The group then proceeded to calculate a “historical cultural production index” for those persons, based on pageviews of the respective biographies (PV). This reviewer would rather call it a “historical figures modern popularity index”. While the recentism bias of the Internet (which Wikipedia acknowledges and tries to fight back) for selection is acknowledged, most of the recentism in this work is in ranking, because of the usage of pageviews. As WikiStats shows, 20% of requests come from a country (the US) with only 5% of the world population, or some 0.3% of the total population in history (assumed as ~108 billion). Therefore there is an error/bias of probably two orders of magnitude in the “score” for “USA” figures; perhaps three, if we add that five years of pageviews are used as sample for the whole current generation. L* is an interesting attempt to correct the “languages count” for a person (L) in the cases where visits are amassed in single languages/countries; but a similar correction would be needed for PV as well.

From the perspective of Wikipedia editors, it’s a pity that Wikipedia is the main source for such a rank, because this means that Wikipedians can’t use it to fill gaps: the distribution of topic coverage across languages is complex and far from perfect; while content translation tools will hopefully help make it more even, prioritisation is needed. It would be wonderful to have a rank of notably missing biographies per language editions of Wikipedia, especially for under-represented groups, which could then be forwarded to the local editors and featured prominently to attract contributions. This is a problem often worked on, from ancient times to recent tools, but we really lack something based on third party sources. We have good tools to identify languages where a given article is missing, but we first need a list (of lists) of persons with any identifier, be it authority record or Wikidata entry or English name or anything else that we can then map ourselves.

The customary complaint about inconsistent inclusion criteria can also be found: «being a player in a second division team in Chile is more likely to pass the notoriety criteria required by Wikipedia Editors than being a faculty at MIT», observe the MIT researchers. However, the fact that nobody has bothered to write an article on a subject doesn’t mean that the project as a whole is not interested in having that article; articles about sports people are just easier to write, the project needs and wants more volunteers for everything. Hidalgo replied that he had some examples of deletions in mind; we have not reviewed them, but it’s also possible that the articles were deleted for their state rather than for the subject itself, a difference to which “victims” of deletion often fail to pay attention to.

WikiBrain: Democratizing computation on Wikipedia

– by Maximilianklein

When analyzing any Wikipedia version, getting the underlying data can be a hard engineering task, beyond the difficulty of the research itself. Being developed by researchers from Macalester College and the University of Minnesota, WikiBrain aims to “run a single program that downloads, parses, and saves Wikipedia data on commodity hardware.” [2] Wikipedia dump-downloaders and parsers have long existed, but WikiBrain is more ambitious in that it tries to be even friendlier by introducing three main primitives: a multilingual concept network, semantic relatedness algorithms, and geospatial data integration. With those elements, the authors are hoping that Wikipedia research will become a mix-and-match affair.

Waldo Tobler’s First Law of Geography – “everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things” – can be shown true for Wikipedia articles in just a few lines of code with WikiBrain.

The first primitive is the multilingual concept network. Since the release of Wikidata, the Universal Concepts that all language versions of Wikipedia represent have mostly come to be defined by the Wikidata item that each language mostly links to. “Mostly” is a key word here, because there are still some edge cases, like the English Wikipedia’s distinguishing between the concepts of “high school” and “secondary school“, while others do not. WikiBrain will give you the Wikidata graph of multilingual concepts by default, and the power to tweak this as you wish.

The next primitive is semantic relatedness (SR), which is the process of quantifying how close two articles are by their meaning. There have been literally hundreds of SR algorithms proposed over the last two decades. Some rely on Wikipedia’s links and categories directly. Others require a text corpus, for which Wikipedia can be used. Most modern SR algorithms can be built one way or another with Wikipedia. WikiBrain supplies the ability to use five state-of-the-art SR algorithms, or their ensemble method – a combination of all 5.

Already at this point an example was given of how to mix our primitives. In just a few lines of code, one could easily find which articles in all languages were closest to the English article on “jazz”, and which were also a tagged as a film in Wikidata.

The last primitive is a suite of tools that are useful for spatial computation. So extracting location data out of Wikipedia and Wikidata can become a standardized process. Incorporated are some classic solutions to the “geoweb scale problem” – that regardless of an entity’s footprint in space, it is represented by a point. That is a problem one shouldn’t have to think about, and indeed, WikiBrain will solve it for you under the covers.

To demonstrate the power of WikiBrain the authors then provide a case study wherein they replicate previous research that took “thousands of lines of code”, and do it in “just a few” using WikiBrain’s high-level syntax. The case study is cherry-picked as is it previous research of one of the listed authors on the paper – of course it’s easy to reconstruct one’s own previous research in a framework you custom-built. The case study is a empirical testing of Tobler’s first law of geography using Wikipedia articles. Essentially one compares the SR of articles versus their geographic closeness – and it’s verified they are positively linked.

Does the world need an easier, simpler, more off-the-shelf Wikipedia research tool? Yes, of course. Is WikiBrain it? Maybe or maybe not, depending on who you are. The software described in the paper is still version 0.3. There are notes explaining the upcoming features of edit history parsing, article quality ranking, and user data parsing. The project and its examples are written in Java, which is a language choice that targets a specific demographic of researchers, and alienates others. That makes WikiBrain a good tool for Java programmers who do not know how to parse off-line dumps, and have an interest in either multilingual concept alignment, semantic relatedness, and spatial relatedness. For everyone else, they will have to make do with one of the other 20+ alternative parsers and write their own glueing code. That’s OK though; frankly the idea to make one research tool to “rule them all” is too audacious and commandeering for the open-source ecosystem. Still that doesn’t mean that WikiBrain can’t find its userbase and supporters.

Newcomer productivity and pre-publication review

It’s time for another interesting paper on newcomer retention[3] from authors with a proven track record of tackling this issue. This time they focus on the Articles for Creation|Wikipedia:Articles for Creation|Articles for Creation mechanism. The authors conclude that instead of improving the success of newcomers, AfC in fact further decreases their productivity. The authors note that once AfC was fully rolled out around mid-2011, it began to be widely used – the percentage of newcomers using it went up from <5% to ~25%. At the same time, the percentage of newbie articles surviving on Wikipedia went down from ~25% to ~15%. The authors hypothesize that the AfC process is unfriendly to newcomers due to the following issues: 1) it’s too slow, and 2) it hides drafts from potential collaborators.

The authors find that the AfC review process is not subject to insurmountable delays; they conclude that “most drafts will be submitted for review quickly and that reviews will happen in a timely manner.”. In fact, two-thirds of reviews take place within a day of submission (a figure that positively surprised this reviewer, though a current AfC status report suggests a situation has worsened since: “Severe backlog: 2599 pending submissions”). In either case, the authors find that about a third or so of newcomers using the AfC system fail to understand the fact that they need to finalize the process by submitting their drafts to the review at all – a likely indication that the AfC instructions need revising, and that the AfC regulars may want to implement a system of identifying stalled drafts, which in some cases may be ready for mainspace despite having never been officially “submitted” (due to their newbie creator not knowing about this step or carrying it out properly).

However, the authors do stand by their second hypothesis: they conclude that the AfC articles suffer from not receiving collaborative help that they would get if they were mainspaced. They discuss a specific AfC, for the article Dwight K. Shellman, Jr/Dwight Shellman. This article has been tagged as potentially rescuable, and has been languishing in that state for years, hidden in the AfC namespace, together with many other similarly backlogged articles, all stuck in low-visibility limbo and prevented from receiving proper Wikipedia-style collaboration-driven improvements (or deletion discussions) as an article in the mainspace would receive.

The researchers identify a number of other factors that reduce the functionality of the AfC process. As in many other aspects of Wikipedia, negative feedback dominates. Reviewers are rarely thanked for anything, but are more likely to be criticized for passing an article deemed problematic by another editor; thus leading to the mentality that “rejecting articles is safest” (as newbies are less likely to complain about their article’s rejection than experienced editors about passing one). AfC also suffers from the same “one reviewer” problem as GA – the reviewer may not always be qualified to carry out the review, yet the newbies have little knowledge how to ask for a second opinion. The authors specifically discuss a case of reviewers not familiar with the specific notability criteria: “[despite being notable] an article about an Emmy-award winning TV show from the 1980’s was twice declined at AfC, before finally being published 15 months after the draft was started”. Presumably if this article was not submitted to a review it would never be deleted from the mainspace.

The authors are critical of the interface of the AfC process, concluding that it is too unfriendly to newbies, instruction wise: “Newcomers do not understand the review process, including how to submit articles for review and the expected timeframe for reviews” and “Newcomers cannot always find the articles they created. They may recreate drafts, so that the same content is created and reviewed multiple times. This is worsened by having multiple article creation spaces(Main, userspace, Wikipedia talk, and the recently-created Draft namespace“.

The researchers conclude that AfC works well as a filtering process for the encyclopedia, however “for helping and training newcomers [it] seems inadequate”. AfC succeeds in protecting content under the (recently established) speedy deletion criterion G13, in theory allowing newbies to keep fixing it – but many do not take this opportunity. Nor can the community deal with this, and thus the authors call for a creation of “a mechanism for editors to find interesting drafts”. That said, this reviewer wants to point out that the G13 backlog, while quite interesting (thousands of articles almost ready for main space …), is not the only backlog Wikipedia has to deal with – something the writers overlook. The G13 backlog is likely partially a result of imperfect AfC design that could be improved, but all such backlogs are also an artifact of the lack of active editors affecting Wikipedia projects on many levels.

In either case, AfC regulars should carefully examine the authors suggestions. This reviewer finds the following ideas in particular worth pursuing. 1) Determine which drafts need collaboration and make them more visible to potential editors. Here the authors suggest use of a recent academic model that should help automatically identify valuable articles, and then feeding those articles to SuggestBot. 2) Support newcomers’ first contributions – almost a dead horse at this point, but we know we are not doing enough to be friendly to newcomers. In particular, the authors note that we need to create better mechanisms for newcomers to get help on their draft, and to improve the article creation advice – especially the Article Wizard. (As a teacher who has introduced hundreds of newcomers to Wikipedia, this reviewer can attest that the current outreach to newbies on those levels is grossly inadequate.)

A final comment to the community in general: was AfC intended to help newcomers, or was it intended from the start to reduce the strain on new page patrollers by sandboxing the drafts in the first place? One of the roles of AfC is to prevent problematic articles from appearing in the mainspace, and it does seem that in this role it is succeeding quite well. English Wikipedia community has rejected the flagged revisions-like tool, but allowed implementation of it on a voluntary basis for newcomers, who in turn may not often realize that by choosing the AfC process, friendly on the surface, they are in fact slow-tracking themselves, and inviting extraordinary scrutiny. This leads to a larger question that is worth considering: we, the Wikipedia community of active editors, have declined to have our edits classified as second-tier and hidden from the public until they are reviewed, but we are fine pushing this on to the newbies. To what degree is this contributing to the general trend of Wikipedia being less and less friendly to newcomers? Is the resulting quality control worth turning away potential newbies? Would we be here if years ago our first experience with Wikipedia was through AfC?

Briefly

PLOS Biology is an open-access peer-reviewed scientific journal covering all aspects of biology. Publication began on October 13, 2003.
(“PLoS Biology cover April 2009″ by PLoS, under CC-BY-2.5)

15% of PLOS Biology articles are cited on Wikipedia

A conference paper titled “An analysis of Wikipedia references across PLOS publications”[4] asked the following research questions: “1) To what extent are scholarly articles referenced in Wikipedia, and what content is particularly likely to be mentioned?” and “2) How do these Wikipedia references correlate with other article-level metrics such as downloads, social media mentions, and citations?”. To answer this, the authors analyzed which PLOS articles are referenced on Wikipedia. They found that as of March 2014, about 4% of PLOS articles were mentioned on Wikipedia, which they conclude is “similar to mentions in science blogs or the post-publication peer review service, F1000Prime“. About half of articles mentioned on Wikipedia are also mentioned on Facebook, suggesting that being cited on Wikipedia is related to being picked up by other social media. Most of Wikipedia cites come from PLOS Genetics, PLOS Biology and other biology/medicine related PLOS outlets, with PLOS One accounting for only 3% total, though there are indications this is changing over time. 15% of all articles from PLOS Biology have been cited on Wikipedia, the highest ratio among the studied journals. Unfortunately, this is very much a descriptive paper, and the authors stop short of trying to explain or predict anything. The authors also observe that “By far the most referenced PLOS article is a study on the evolution of deep-sea gastropods (Welch, 2010) with 1249 references, including 541 in the Vietnamese Wikipedia.”

“Big data and small: collaborations between ethnographers and data scientists”

Ethnography is often seen as the least quantitative branch of social science, and this[5] essay-like article’s style is a good illustration. This is, essentially, a self-reflective story of a Wikipedia research project. The author, an ethnographer, recounts her collaboration with two big data scholars in a project dealing with a large Wikipedia dataset. The results of their collaboration are presented here and have been briefly covered by our Newsletter in Issue 8/13. This article can be seen as an interesting companion to the prior, Wikipedia-focused piece, explaining how it was created, though it fails to answer questions of interest to the community, such as “why did the authors choose Wikipedia as their research ground” or about their experiences (if any) editing Wikipedia.

“Emotions under discussion: gender, status and communication in online collaboration”

Researchers investigated[6] “how emotion and dialogue differ depending on the status, gender, and the communication network of the ~12,000 editors who have written at least 100 comments on the English Wikipedia’s article talk pages.” Researchers found that male administrators tend to use an impersonal and neutral tone. Non-administrator females used more relational forms of communication. Researchers also found that “editors tend to interact with other editors having similar emotional styles (e.g., editors expressing more anger connect more with one another).” Authors of this paper will present their research at the September Wikimedia Research and Data showcase.

References

  1. http://pantheon.media.mit.edu/methods
  2. Sen, Shilad. “WikiBrain: Democratizing computation on Wikipedia“. OpenSym ’14 0 (0): 1–19. doi:10.1145/2641580.2641615.  Open access
  3. Jodi Schneider, Bluma S. Gelley Aaron Halfaker: Accept, decline, postpone: How newcomer productivity is reduced in English Wikipedia by pre-publication review http://jodischneider.com/pubs/opensym2014.pdf OpenSym ’14 , August 27–29, 2014, Berlin
  4. Fenner, Martin; Jennifer Lin (June 6, 2014), “An analysis of Wikipedia references across PLOS publications”, altmetrics14 workshop at WebSci, doi:10.6084/m9.figshare.1048991 
  5. Ford, Heather (1 July 2014). “Big data and small: collaborations between ethnographers and data scientists“. Big Data & Society 1 (2): 2053951714544337. doi:10.1177/2053951714544337. ISSN 2053-9517. 
  6. Laniado, David; Carlos Castillo; Mayo Fuster Morell; Andreas Kaltenbrunner (2014-08-20). “Emotions under Discussion: Gender, Status and Communication in Online Collaboration”. PLoS ONE 9 (8): e104880. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0104880. 

Wikimedia Research Newsletter
Vol: 4 • Issue: 8 • August 2014
This newletter is brought to you by the Wikimedia Research Committee and The Signpost
Subscribe: Syndicate the Wikimedia Research Newsletter feed Email @WikiResearch on Identi.ca WikiResearch on Twitter[archives] [signpost edition] [contribute] [research index]

by wikimediablog at September 13, 2014 11:50 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

This Month in Education

Wikimedia Foundation

Emmanuel Engelhart, Inventor of Kiwix: the Offline Wikipedia Browser

This user profile is part of a series about Offline Wikipedia.

Emmanuel Engelhart’s “offline Wikipedia”, Kiwix, is entirely open source.

“Emmanuel Engelhart-49″ by VGrigas (WMF), under CC-BY-SA-3.0

Kiwix running a copy of Wikipedia in German on an OLPC laptop operated by Engelhart in 2012.

“Berlin Hackathon 2012-48″ by Victorgrigas, under CC-BY-SA-3.0

Wikipedia’s goal is to be the sum of human knowledge, available to anyone at any time, but when billions of people have no internet access at all, how can that goal be realized? The answer according to software developer Emmanuel Engelhart (User:Kelson) is quite simple – take Wikipedia offline.

Together with Renaud Gaudin, he invented Kiwix, an open source software which allows users to download a copy of Wikipedia in its entirety for offline reading.

Kiwix uses all of Wikipedia’s content through the Parsoid wiki parser to package articles into an open source .zim file that can be read by the special Kiwix browser. Since Kiwix was released in 2007, dozens of languages of Wikipedia have been made available as .zim files, as has other free content, such as Wikisource, Wiktionary and Wikivoyage.

After becoming a Wikipedia editor in 2004, Engelhart became interested in discussions of offline versions of Wikipedia. At the time, Engelhart was in his mid-20s and living in his small village near the town of Vendôme, a few hundred kilometers south of Paris. Learning that a 2003 proposal by Jimmy Wales to create a CD version of Wikipedia, Version 1.0, never made its initial timescale, inspired Engelhart to take action.

He argues that access to information is a basic right that the whole world should be entitled to. “Water is a common good. You understand why you have to care about water. Wikipedia is the same; it’s a common good. We have to care about Wikipedia.”

“Tools are not neutral. They have a big impact on our society and software is [becoming] always more central.” Engelhart says. “We live in an industrial and technical world…so how we make software, what are the rules around software, is really important.”

Engelhart elaborated his reasons for creating the software in an email: “The contents of Wikipedia should be available for everyone! Even without Internet access. This is why I have launched the Kiwix project. Our users are all over the world: sailors on the oceans, poor students thirsty for knowledge, globetrotters almost living in planes, world’s citizens suffering from censorship or free minded prisoners. For all these people, Kiwix provides a simple and practical solution to ponder about the world.”

Profile by Joe Sutherland, Wikimedia Foundation Communications volunteer

Interview by Victor Grigas, Wikimedia Foundation Storyteller

Do you have a story about your use of Offline Wikipedia that you’d like to share? We’d love to hear it! Email: vgrigas(at)wikimedia.org

by carlosmonterrey at September 13, 2014 03:29 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

September 12, 2014

Wikimedia Germany

Wikipedia im Deutschen Bundestag

Foto: Martin Kraft [CC-BY-SA-4.0 oder CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Was bereits mit Erfolg in den deutschen Landesparlamenten und dem Europaparlament Schule machte, wurde in dieser Woche nun auch im Deutschen Bundestag verwirklicht: Fünf Tage lang arbeiteten Fotografen, Autoren und Unterstützer der Wikipedia unter dem Motto Wiki loves parliaments intensiv an einer umfangreichen Erschaffung freier Inhalte zu den 631 derzeit dem Bundestag angehörenden Abgeordneten. Sowohl die Organisation als auch die Durchführung wurde mit ehrenamtlichem und zugleich hoch professionellem Engagement von etwa 40 Wikipedianerinnen und Wikipedianern realisiert. An mehreren Stationen wurden die Politiker erst über die Wikimedia-Projekte und die Vorteile freien Wissen informiert. Danach wurden sie für die Fotos geschminkt und schließlich fotografiert. Zusätzlich entstanden Filmaufnahmen mit kurzen persönlichen Vorstellungen der Abgeordneten. In der Projekt-Redaktion wurden die Bilder direkt vor Ort bearbeitet. So war es möglich, sie sofort online zu stellen und die entsprechenden Wikipedia-Artikel mit dem aktuellen Material zu illustrieren. Gefördert wurde das Projekt durch das Förderprogramm Freies Wissen und unterstützt u.a. durch Fototechnik von Wikimedia Deutschland und Wikimedia Österreich.

Viele Fotos und Videos sind bereits jetzt auf Commons zur Weiternutzung bereit gestellt. Weitere werden in Kürze folgen.

Wikimedia Deutschland bedankt sich bei allen Helferinnen und Helfern für ihr außerordentliches Engagement bei diesem besonderen Projekt!

by Nicolas Rück at September 12, 2014 04:00 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

Wikimedia Estonia

Kuidas teha häid pilte kultuurimälestistest?

Millised on sobilikud valgusolud ühe pildi tegemiseks? Fotol on Tartu Katoliku kirik.

Millised on sobilikud valgusolud ühe pildi tegemiseks? Fotol on Tartu Katoliku kirik.

Taaskord toimub Vikipeedias Kultuurimälestiste fotovõistlus. Kõrvuti osalemissooviga võib kergelt tekkida küsimus, et kuidas teha häid pilte, mida võistlusele esitada. Milline oleks üks õige mälestisevääriline foto ja kuidas sellist imelooma tabada?

Nii mõndagi sõltub kasutatavast tehnikast ja alati võib püüda kehva fotot välja vabandada väidetega stiilis “aparaat ei teinud paremat”. Kallima tehnika soetamine ei too aga automaatselt kaasa paremaid pilte. Profiaparaadi omamine teeb kedagi samavõrra profifotograafiks, kui pastaka ja kirjapaberi omamine kedagi teist kirjanikuks. Hea fotograaf saab ka kehva tehnikaga häid fotosid. Mis on aga need nipid, mille järgimine aitaks kasvatada enda tehtavate fotode väärtust?

Alustaksin sedapuhku sellest, et fotograafia on oma olemuselt valguse jäädvustamine. Ilma valguseta, mida filmilindile või sensori pinnale püüda, ei saa sündida ühtegi fotot. Parima võimaliku foto tegemiseks ei vaja me aga mitte lihtsalt suurt hulka valgust, vaid võimalikult head valgust. Seega on esimeseks asjaks, mida foto puhul jälgida, valgus.

Teades, mida soovid pildile püüda, tasub ühtlasi mõelda sellele, et kuidas tabada parimad olud foto tegemiseks. Millisel kellajal ja millise ilmaga võiksime saada ideaalse foto? Näiteks jätab väga tugev keskpäevane valgus häirivalt teravad varjud ning loob tohutu kontrasti pildi heledamate ja tumedamate osade vahel. Sellistes oludes võib-olla hea pildi saamine tõsiseks katsumuseks. Oluliselt paremaid tingimusi võivad luua varajane hommikutund, hilisõhtu või sobilikult pilvine ilm.

Päike paikneb sõltuvalt kella- ja aastaajast taevavõlvil eri punktides – ühel hetkel võib ta pakkuda täiuslikku valgust näiteks vana mõisahoone fassaadi jäädvustamiseks ja teisel momendil selle pinna hoopis varju jätta. Pildistamiseks sobilike aegade leidmiseks on loodud ka hulk abivahendeid (näide). Lisaks tuleks kasuks ilmastikuolude jälgimine, sest kui mõnel päeval on ilmaolud pildistamiseks ääretult soodsad, siis teisel ajal võib kehva valguse tõttu ka parim ülesvõte meenutada suvalist klõpsu. Seega tasub otsida head valgust.

Pildinäiteid erinevatest valgusoludest. Uus Anatoomikum Tartus.

6:58, 31. mai 2014

6:58, 31. mai 2014

18:19, 10. oktoober 2013

18:19, 10. oktoober 2013

18:45, 10. oktoober 2013

18:45, 10. oktoober 2013

Kui valgust leidub, siis on järgmiseks katsumuseks selle oskuslik püüdmine. Mängides säriaja (1/x), avaarvu (f) ja sensori tundlikkusega (ISO), saame muuta, kui kaua valgust püüame, kui palju seda korraga kaamerasse laseme ja kui tundlikult me seda registreerime. Üldiselt suudavad tänased kaamerad neid parameetrid iseseisvalt võrdlemisi edukalt juhtida, kuid ainult autopiloodile loota ei tasu. Milleks jätta hea tulemuse saamist juhuse hooleks?

Vähese valguse korral võib mänguruum oluliselt kitseneda. Nõnda on ideaalis fotograafil kaasas statiiv või õnnestub kasutada mõnda stabiilset alust. Liikumatu aluspind lubab nimelt pikkade säriaegade kasutamist ja annab nõnda oluliselt laiema valikuvabaduse kaameraparameetrite seadmisel. Nii ei pea näiteks ISO väärtust põhja keerama, et säriaega talutava piirini langetada, kus käte värin ei ohustaks enam foto teravust. Suurem tundlikkus kasvatab ju ka müra hulka fotol ja viib sellega pildi kvaliteeti alla. Samuti lubab statiivi kasutamine fotode tegemist kaugustest, kuhu piltniku käed muidu ulatuda ei pruugi.

Keskpäevane foto Tartu Kaubamajast, kus taevas on täiesti ära põlenud ja värvid jäävad tuhmiks

Keskpäevane foto Tartu Kaubamajast, kus taevas on täiesti ära põlenud ja värvid jäävad tuhmiks

Kui fotode arvutisse laadimisel vaatavad meile aga ikka vastu ühteviisi õnnetu olemisega hallid pikslikogumid, siis saame loota veel järeltöötluse abile. Ei ole see küll võluvits, mis kehva lähtematerjali suurepärase kraamiks peksab, aga mõned kerged obadused võivad siiski kasulikuks osutuda. Siiski tasub meeles pidada, et igasuguse töötluse eesmärgiks peaks olema pildi täiustamine viisil, mis lähendab fotot selle, mida fotograaf ise nägi. Objekti moonutamine ebatõepärasele kujule on vaatajat eksitav ning igati taunimisväärne.

Hele-tumeduse skaalal on meil kasutada 256 väärtust (iga piksli heleduse määrab 8 bitti, millest tuleneb 28 eri väärtust). Pildi histogramm võimaldab meil seda jaotust graafilisel kujul näha. Hea pildi puhul on esindatud pea kõik väärtused ja puuduvad ainult mõlemad äärmused (st täiesti mustad ja valged pikslid). Nii teame, et oleme salvestanud kogu hele-tumeduse skaala. Küll on aga kerge juhtuma, et jääme mingis pildi osas detailidest sootuks ilma. Näiteks “põletatakse” tihti ära taevas – moodustub ühtlaselt valge väli, kus pole säilinud ainsatki detaili. Sellises kohas ei ole paraku enam suurt midagi päästa ja seda oleks pidanud märkama juba pildistamise ajal.

Võimalik on aga ka olukord, kus kaamera mõõdab pildi heledust valesti (nt lume või udu puhul) ja saame tulemusena foto, mis kasutab ainult väikest osa etteantud skaalal. Nõnda on pilt ühteviisi tuhm ja ei meenuta oma kontrastsuselt kuidagi seda, mida fotograaf tegelikult nägi. Selle vea parandamist võimaldavad paljud pilditöötlusprogrammida. Allolev näide on tehtud vabavaralise programmiga GIMP ja sellel on näha foto enne ja pärast korrigeerimist. Pildil on Londonis asuv Shard.

gsg

naidis_london-2-kruusamagi-ivo

Inimsilm suudab tegelikult tabada oluliselt suuremat hele-tumeduste skaalat kui 256 tooni ja saab hakkama detailide tuvastamisega oludes, kus osa vaateväljast on väga ere ning teine osa jääb sootumaks varju. Suurema ulatuse tabamisega tegeleb HDR-fotograafia, kus salvestatakse järjest 2 või enam fotot eri kaameraseadetega ning keevitatakse pärast saadud pildid spetsiaalse tarkvara abil üheks kokku. Nii õnnestub teha detailseid pilte ka äärmiselt keerukates valgusoludest. Selle lähem tutvustamine vajaks aga juba eraldi pikemat postitust. Alustuseks on lihtsam jälgida, et ühe pildi raames sensorile salvestatu ei oleks üle- või alavalgustatud.

Järgneb…

12. sept 2014 - Posted by | Määratlemata |

Kommentaare veel pole.

by Ivo Kruusamägi at September 12, 2014 11:21 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Estonia

Wikimedia Foundation

New images released are quickly put to use

The image is a pictorial illustration depicting possible scar lines after surgery for oesophageal cancer

Diagram of possible scar lines after surgery for oesophageal cancer, from Cancer Research UK and now on Commons.
(Image by Cancer Research UK, under CC-BY-SA-4.0 )

This post was written by John Byrne, Wikimedian in Residence at the Royal Society and Cancer Research UK and was first published on the Wikimedia UK blog

I’ve had two recent uploads of images released by organizations where I am Wikimedian in Residence. Neither of them are huge in quantity compared to some uploads, but I’m really pleased that an unusually large percentage of them are already used in articles. Many thanks to all the editors who put them in articles, especially Keilana for CRUK and Duncan.Hull for the Royal Society images.

The first release was by Cancer Research UK (CRUK), of 390 cancer-related diagrams, including many covering anatomy and cell biology. Many medical editors had said they were keen to have these available, and they have been quickly added to many articles, with 190 already being used, some twice, and mostly on high-traffic medical articles like breast cancer, lung cancer and cervical cancer.

Wikipedia cancer articles tend to be mostly illustrated with alarming shots of tumours, or purple-stained pathology slides which convey little to non-professional readers. The new images are from the patient information pages on CRUK’s website and explain in simple terms basic aspects of the main cancers – where they arise, how they grow and spread. Some show surgical procedures that are hard to convey in prose.

The photo is a portrait of Professor Martin Hairer FRS

Professor Martin Hairer FRS, already used in 18 different language versions of Wikipedia
(“Professor Martin Hairer FRS” by Royal Society uploader, under CC-BY-SA-3.0 )

Many files have generous labelling inside the image. All the files are in svg format, allowing for easy translation of these labels into other languages, which should be especially useful over time. All use the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International licence. All the images of this type that CRUK have are now uploaded, but additional ones should be uploaded as they are created, and other types of image, including infographics, are in the pipeline.

We are also working to change the standard model release forms CRUK uses, so that photos and videos featuring people that are made in future will be easier to release. CRUK also has some very attractive short animations, which in some ways are more culturally neutral and so preferable for use around the world. These avoid model release issues and some should be coming soon.

The other release is by the Royal Society, the UK’s National Academy for the Sciences. I’ve now completed my term as Wikipedian in Residence there, but had got their agreement to release the official portrait photos of the new Fellows elected in 2014, with the intention to continue this in future years. Some photos of their building were also released.

By early September, only a month after uploading completed, of the 72 files uploaded 38 (53%) are now used in Wikipedia articles. The portrait of Professor Martin Hairer, who won the Fields Medal this August is used in 18 different language versions of Wikipedia, having fortuitously been uploaded just before it was announced that he had won the Fields Medal, which is often called the mathematician’s equivalent of a Nobel. Most of the biographies were started after this announcement. Other images of Fellows are used in the French, Chinese and Persian Wikipedias, as well as English.

The availability of high-quality portraits is very likely to encourage the writing of articles on those Fellows who still lack Wikipedia biographies. There are 15 of these, which is already a better (lower) figures than for recent years such as 2012, where 29 still lack biographies.

John Byrne, Wikimedian in Residence at the Royal Society and Cancer Research UK

by carlosmonterrey at September 12, 2014 12:05 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

September 11, 2014

Wikimedia Foundation

WikiProject Report: Bats, gloves and baseballs

Photo of Maury Wills, Milton Berle, Jimmy Piersall and Willie Mays in a salute to baseball on the television program The Hollywood Palace.

“Maury Wills Milton Berle Jimmy Piersall Willie Mays Hollywood Palace 1967″ by ABC Television, under public domain

Last month, the Wikipedia Signpost, the English Wikipedia’s community-written newsletter, talked with three members of WikiProject Baseball: users Go Phightins!, Wizardman and isaacl. A WikiProject is a team of contributors who aim to improve Wikipedia articles on a specific topic. Every WikiProject has a special focus area (for example, American history). In this case, the subject is baseball.

Like many Wikipedia editors, WikiProject contributors are often motivated by a great passion for a given topic. Perhaps user Go Phightins! embodies this devotion best. “Baseball is a sport that I really enjoy and is the namesake of my username, as a matter of fact, the Philadelphia Phillies are known colloquially as the Phightin Phils.” For contributors, WikiProject baseball is not just a way to contribute to baseball-related articles, it’s also a place to talk all things baseball with other liked-minded individuals, explains user issacl. “Discussions on the project talk page are generally constructive and embody a cooperative spirit, which keeps editors interested.”

A game on Chicago’s Wrigley Field, April 13, 2005

“Wrigley Field Apr 2005″ by Papushin, under PD

Every WikiProject has its own peculiarities specific to that topic. For example, WikiProject cities has to keep a constant watch for changing factors within a city like population or transportation. WikiProject Baseball is no different in its constant efforts to maintain baseball articles as up-to-date as possible – especially during the active season. “One of the most crucial aspects of the project is stat updates and vandalism watches to articles, especially on current players,” explains Go Phightins. Maintenance gets particularly busy during times of great commotion, like the trade deadline midway through the season. “There is rampant speculation within the media about baseball players and transactions between teams, so upholding the principle of WP:CRYSTAL ["Wikipedia is not a crystal ball"] by refuting speculative edits while at the same time remaining committed to being an encyclopedia anyone can edit is a time-consuming, but ultimately worthwhile task.”

Though this may all seem like a lot of work, rewards come in the form of knowing that you’ve contributed to the collective knowledge on a topic that is important to you – and occasionally your work might earn recognition as a featured article, too. Wizardman and Go Phightins! both have enjoyed having some of their articles featured. Go Phightins! explains, “Jim Thome, my one and only featured article, played Major League Baseball for 20+ years and reached featured status after more than a year of work. I thoroughly enjoyed working on his article, as he was one of my favorite players back when he was a member of the Phillies and really is a ‘good guy.’” Wizardman adds, “I’ve contributed several featured articles and good articles over my time. Greatest is tough to say, but it would be between Bob Feller, which was already a good article that I completely modified to get through to featured article status and Harmon Killebrew, which was a stub I suggested as a collaboration that eventually progressed from good to featured.”

When asked what else they wanted to share, Go Phightins! stressed the good-natured environment of WikiProject Baseball. “The editors at WikiProject Baseball are an awesome group of folks with whom to collaborate on articles, but perhaps more importantly, are dedicated to enforcing Wikipedia policy with tact and excellence in dealing with new and clueless contributors (a group of which I was once a member).” Wizardman jokingly adds, “It’s both a great and easy project to get involved in, even if you like the [rival team] you’re still welcome!” If you find yourself fond of baseball, interested in sports stats and looking for a great community to share a mutual interest, then WikiProject Baseball might be for you. User isaacl puts it simply: “With the state of baseball analysis ever-improving, competition in MLB continues to be fierce, and we are the beneficiaries—enjoy the season!”

For more info on WikiProject Baseball, read the full Signpost interview by user Seattle, or go to the WikiProject’s overview page.

Report by Carlos Monterrey, communications associate for the Wikimedia Foundation

by carlosmonterrey at September 11, 2014 05:22 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Germany

Wikimedia:Woche 28/2014

Hier kommt die 28. Ausgabe der Wikimedia:Woche im Jahr 2014. Dieser frühherbstliche Newsletter wird gemeinschaftlich von Projektaktiven und Wikimedia Deutschland erstellt, serviert in kleinen Häppchen Aktuelles und Brisantes aus der internationalen Wikimedia-Welt und möchte zum Weiterlesen anregen.

Die Woche entsteht in einem offenen Redaktionsprozess: Wenn du über die internationalen Kanäle auf Links oder Storys stößt, die für die lokale Arbeit der deutschsprachigen Community von Relevanz sein können, hinterlasse einen Hinweis in der nächsten Woche! Du kannst entweder selber einen Teaser-Text vorbereiten, oder einfach nur einen Link setzen, den wir dann vor Versand mit einer Zusammenfassung dekorieren.

Wenn du Wünsche zur Woche im Allgemeinen oder Anregungen zur Abdeckung spezieller Themen hast, melde dich gerne in den Kommentaren. Allen Mitwirkenden gilt hier wie gewohnt besonderer Dank.

Viel Vergnügen beim Lesen!

Wikimedia:Woche 28/2014

Frühere Ausgaben sind archiviert unter:

Die Liste der Beitragenden kann der Versionsgeschichte der jeweiligen Ausgabe im Archiv in der Wikipedia entnommen werden. Die Ausgabe in der Wikipedia findet sich unter https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Wikimedia:Woche/110914

Foundation und Organisationen

Nachtragshaushalt 2014 für Wikimedia Deutschland

Auf Grund der Neubesetzung des Vorstandes bei Wikimedia Deutschland ist ein Nachtragshaushalt für das laufende Jahr notwendig. Jan Engelmann, Interims-Vorstand, hat im Wikimedia-Forum – für das eine einmalige, kostenfreie Anmeldung notwendig ist – den Entwurf veröffentlicht und zur Diskussion eingeladen.

IEG-Komitee sucht neue Mitglieder

Das Vergabekomitee für die sog. „Individual Engagement Grants“, das Förderprogramm der Wikimedia Foundation für Einzelpersonen, sucht derzeit neue Mitglieder.

Projekte und Initiativen

OER-Konferenz in Berlin

Dieses Wochenende findet die Konferenz zu Freien Bildungsressourcen (Open Education Ressources, OER) in Berlin statt.

Wikimedia Commons wird zehn Jahre alt

Das freie Medienarchiv Wikimedia Commons feier seinen zehnjährigen Gründungstag.

Wikipedia auf Asturisch feiert 10. Geburtstag

Die Wikipedia auf Asturisch, eine der Regionalsprachen in Spanien, feiert am 12. und 13. September ihr zehnjähriges Bestehen. Das spanische Wikimedia-Chapter feiert anlässlich dessen in Oviedo.

Übersetzung des Artikels „Ebola“ in alle Amtssprachen Südafrikas

Der Übersetzungsdienstleister Rubric hat dem südafrikanischen Wikimedia-Chapter die Übersetzung des Artikels „Ebola“ in allen südafrikanischen Amtssprachen gespendet. Damit ist der Artikel ist jetzt auch unter anderem auf Xhosa, Zulu, Setswana, Sesotho, Siswati, Xitsonga, Tshivenda, Nord-Sotho und Ndebele verfügbar. Über Wikipedia:Zero sind die Inhalte kostenfrei verfügbar.

Guide-Camp in Kassel

Die Wikipedianerin Kritzolina schreibt über das jüngst stattgefundene „Guide Camp“, auf dem Konfliktlösungsstrategien in der Wikipedia besprochen wurden.

60 Wege um Neulingen in der Wikipedia zu helfen

Auf der Wikimania fanden abseits des regulären Programms in einem „Discussion Room“ zahlreiche Diskussion zu Wikipedia und ihren Schwesterprojekten statt. Lodewijk Gelauff, (Mit-)Organisator dieser Diskussionraumes fasst eine Diskussion zusammen, bei der es darum ging wie neuen Benutzerinnen und Benutzern in der Wikipedia geholfen werden kann.

Drei Mythen über freie Bildungsressourcen

Till Kreutzer diskutiert auf irights.info drei Mythen der sog. „Open Educational Ressources“ (Freie Bildungsressourcen).

Rückblick auf Abendveranstaltung “Digital Natives”

Am 1. September 2014 fand die zweite Veranstaltung der WMDE-Abendveranstaltugnsreihe “Digitale Kompetenzen” statt, es ging um den Begriff „Digital Natives“ und wie viel Substanz dieser hätte. http://blog.wikimedia.de/2014/09/04/digital-natives-unbefangener-aber-nicht-unbedingt-kompetenter/

Wikimedia Conferentie in den Niederlanden

Am 1. November findet in Utrech wieder eine Wikimedia Conferentie des niederländischen Wikimedia-Chapters statt. Inzwischen ist das vorläufige Programm veröffentlicht worden.

Technik

Bugzilla geht, Phabricator kommt

Mit dem Ansinnen Bugs (Fehlermeldungen) und Wünsche besser an die Entwicklerinnen und Entwickler heranzutragen und für Nicht-Technik-Affine einfacher zu machen, wird demnächst Bugzilla durch das neue System Phabricator ersetzt.

VisualEditor für Internet Explorer 11 verfügbar

Am 11. September wird im Zuge des regulären Updates der VisualEditor auch für den Internet Explorer 11 verfügbar gemacht. Feedback ist sehr erwünscht!

Globale Umbenennungen nur noch en bloc möglich

Ab dem 15. September werden im Zuge der Finalisierung der Vereinheitlichung der Benutzernamen aller Wikimedia-Projekte („Single User Login“) Umbennenung nur noch en bloc (und nicht mehr einzeln) möglich sein. Wann Single User Login jedoch vollständig abgeschlossen sein wird, steht noch nicht fest.

Wikidata und das Outreach-Programm für Frauen

Helen Halbert und Anjali Sharma schreiben (auf Englisch) im Blog von Wikimedia Deutschland was sie im Mai für Wikidata gemacht haben. Dabei ging es unter anderem darum, das Projekt mithilfe von Tutorials und sog. „Einführungstouren“ freundlicher zu machen.

Presse und Websites

Daten der ARD/ZDF-Onlinestudie zu Wikipedia

Die jährlich von ARD und ZDF herausgebrachte Studie zum Online-Verhalten der deutschen Bevölkerung gibt es auch dieses Jahr Daten zur Nutzung der Wikipedia an. 76 Prozent der Deutschen Onlinenutzer ab 14 Jahren nutzen zumindest gelegentlich Wikipedia. Mehr Daten auf Seite 388.

Termine

13./14.9.: GLAM-Wiki-Treffen in Wien

Nach den GLAM-Treffen in Kaufbeuren, Hannover und Bremen findet das nächste GLAM-Wiki-Vernetzungstreffen am 13./14. September in Wien statt

15.09.: Freies Wissen in der Wissenschaft?! Veranstaltung im Rahmen der Tour der MS Wissenschaft in Wien

Im Rahmen der Tour des Ausstellungsschiffes MS Wissenschaft laden Wikimedia Österreich, Wikimedia Deutschland, Wikimedia Schweiz, die Open Knowledge Foundation Österreich und die Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland gemeinsam zur Diskussion über (mehr) Offenheit in der Wissenschaft ein. Die Veranstaltung beginnt um 19:00 Uhr.

20.9.: Wikimedia Deutschland wird Zehn

Wikimedia Deutschland feiert am 20. September um 17 Uhr seinen zehnten Geburtstag. Die Veranstaltung wird in den Berliner Räumen am Tempelhofer Ufer 23-24 stattfinden. Des Weiteren gibt es eine Parallelveranstaltung im Kölner Lokal K sowie einen Live-Stream im YouTube-Kanal von Wikimedia Deutschland. Bei einer Teilnahme in Berlin wird um eine Anmeldung über das Google-Formular erbeten.

29.9.: Digitale Kompetenzen: „Digitalisierung der Arbeitswelt – Zwischen Kollaboration und Selbstausbeutung”

Am 29. September findet in den Räumen von Wikimedia Deutschland die dritte Veranstaltung im Rahmen der Reihe „Digitale Kompetenzen statt“. Unter dem Titel „Digitalisierung der Arbeitswelt – Zwischen Kollaboration und Selbstausbeutung” geht es um die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit den grundlegenden Veränderungen der Arbeitswelt durch zunehmende Digitalisierung sowie deren Folgen.

by Cornelius Kibelka at September 11, 2014 04:28 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

September 10, 2014

Wikimedia France

Wiki Loves Monuments 2014 : c’est parti !

Depuis le 1er septembre, Wiki Loves Monuments, le plus grand concours de photo au monde, est entré dans sa 5ème édition. Wikimédia France soutient l’organisation du concours pour la France (voir le communiqué de presse). Un billet de blog de la Wikimedia Foundation donne le contexte du concours cette année : “Au fil des ans, WLM a pris une ampleur considérable. La 1ère édition a démarré en 2010 aux Pays-Bas, et a permis de prendre plus de 12 500 photos de monuments néerlandais. L’année suivante,  18 pays à travers l’Europe ont participé, totalisant 168 208 photographies mises en ligne – un record homologué par Guinness pour le plus grand concours de photographie au monde. L’année dernière, il y a eu plus de 365 000 téléversements d’images sur Wikimedia Commons, dépassant ainsi le record de l’année précédente. Cette année, au moins 37 pays des 5 continents participent : pour certains, c’est une première ! Les participants de longue date (l’Estonie, la France, l’Allemagne, la Pologne, la Roumanie et la Suisse) sont rejoints pour la première fois par l’Irak, l’Irlande, le Liban, la Macédoine et le Pakistan.”

By Participating_Countries_WLM_2012.svg: Pays participants à WLM 2014 -  Cirdan / Yiyi - CC0

Pays participants à WLM 2014 – Cirdan / Yiyi – CC 0

En France, les photographes se sont déjà mis au travail : pour valoriser leurs clichés pendant toute la durée du concours, “l’image du jour” est sélectionnée quotidiennement. La participation est au rendez-vous, voici d’ailleurs la 5 000ème photo versée pour cette édition 2014 :

Chapelle Saint Hubert, Courcelles (Loiret) - Peter Potrowl - CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chapelle Saint Hubert, Courcelles (Loiret) – Peter Potrowl – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Un concours qui a donc encore de la ressource, alors que Wikimedia Commons vient de souffler sa dixième bougie. L’occasion pour la Wikimedia Foundation de saluer l’énergie, l’enthousiasme et le sérieux des commonistes et les efforts de tous les partenaires à ce projet. “En cette occasion, nous célébrons aussi les partenariats avec des dizaines d’institutions culturelles (GLAM) du monde entier qui ont donné accès à une partie de leurs collections. Leurs contributions ont permis  à Wikimedia Commons de devenir une ressource vitale pour les contenus éducatifs et historiques, et d’assurer une qualité et une richesse toujours plus grande des illustrations pour les articles de Wikipédia. La Fondation reconnaît le dynamisme de la communauté Wikimedia Commons, qui est responsable de l’augmentation de la disponibilité des images et des informations sous licence libre au grand public. La communauté Commons prend son rôle de gardienne des droits des créateurs très au sérieux, en travaillant avec diligence pour confirmer la paternité et l’état des licences des médias envoyés sur Commons. Ce travail se reflète dans le faible nombre de demandes de retrait liées au DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) reçus par la Fondation Wikimedia chaque année.”

by Anne-Laure Prévost at September 10, 2014 07:07 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia France

Wikimedia Germany

Das Ende des Schulbuchs?

Im letzten Teil der Beitragsreihe zum Programm der OER-Konferenz 2014 setzt Tim Schmalfeldt den Fokus auf den dreiteiligen Workshop über die Zukunft des Schulbuchs von Matthias Bock, Dr. David Klett und Dr. Ilias Körner-Wellershaus. Hierbei sollen die Teilnehmerin und Teilnehmer die Chance bekommen über ihre Vorstellungen von Schulbüchern und Bildungsmaterialien zu diskutieren. Im Weiteren greift Sarah Behrens die Herausforderung gesellschaftlicher Beteiligung am bildungspolitischen Diskurs über ein gemeinsames Verständnis von offener Bildung auf, welche in dem Vortrag von Dr. Anja Wagner und Dr. Markus Deimann auf der OERde14 diskutiert wird.

Offene Bildungsressourcen in der Schule

Tim Schmalfeldt über den Workshop von Matthias Bock, Dr. David Klett und Dr. Ilias Körner-Wellershaus  „ Zukunft des Schulbuchs ­- Verlage, freie Lizenzen und die Realität im Unterricht? Workshop: Lehrer stellen Verlage und Politik auf die Probe“.

Kontroversität und Konsensfindung sind Grundprinzipien der politischen Bildung. Und ein Konsens ist nur dann tragfähig, wenn möglichst viele Gruppen an der Meinungsbildung beteiligt werden. In diesem Workshop kommen nicht nur OER-Anhänger zu Wort. Verlage, Lehrerinnen und Lehrer und Politik finden sich zusammen, um über nicht weniger als die Zukunft des Schulbuchs zu diskutieren.

“Going open (education)”, Bild von Jtneill, CC-BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Dabei geht es zunächst darum, sich mit wichtigen Fragen auseinanderzusetzen: Können die hohen Qualitätsstandards, die Schulbuchredakteure gewährleisten, auch bei offenen Materialien gesichert werden? Birgt die staatliche Unterstützung von OER die Gefahr „staatlich verordneter“ Materialien? Ist es gerechtfertigt, dass Schulbuchverlage alle Rechte für ihre Materialien beanspruchen, auch wenn diese wesentlich aus den Landeshaushalten finanziert werden? In einem weiteren Schritt soll dann nach Lösungen für die vielfältigen Herausforderungen gesucht werden, die mit einer Verankerung von offenen Bildungsressourcen im Feld Schule einhergehen.

Diese Herausforderungen gibt es auf allen Seiten: Die Verlage verdienen seit Jahrzehnten mit Unterrichtsmaterialien Geld und sehen dieses Geschäftsmodell nun durch OER in Teilen bedroht. Die Lehrenden müssen ihrerseits eine Kultur des Teilens oft erst erlernen. Und während manche von ihnen offensiv einfordern, Materialien ohne Rechtebeschränkungen bearbeiten und an ihre SchülerInnen verteilen zu können, deuten andere OER als zusätzliche Belastung und sehen schlicht nicht die Notwendigkeit für offene Bildungsressourcen – gibt es doch schon eine Fülle guter Materialien und die „Umwege über die Kopierer“. Die Politik muss die verschiedenen Interessen ausgleichen, Richtlinien und Rahmenbedingungen für den sinnvollen Einsatz von OER finden und schaffen. Dabei kommt ihr die Idee von OER einerseits entgegen – etwa dort, wo es um konkrete Beteiligungsprozesse geht. Anderseits sieht sie ihre Bildungshoheit in Gefahr und fürchtet mit Blick auf die Schulbuchverlage auch um den Verlust von Arbeitsplätzen.

Auf dem Markt für Bildungsmaterialien tummeln sich jedoch längst nicht mehr nur die Verlage. Die Stände großer IT-­Konzerne wie Apple und Microsoft sind auf den Bildungsmessen heute fast so groß wie die der etablierten Bildungsanbieter. Diese Entwicklung kann im schlechtesten Fall dazu führen, dass OER im Sinne kostenfreier “Contents” als Verfügungsmasse betrachtet werden, über die sich Tablets, Notebooks und andere technische Lösungen an Schulen verkaufen oder Nutzerdaten von SchülerInnen wie LehrerInnen generieren lassen.

Vielleicht ist diese gemeinsame Herausforderung ja eine mögliche Basis für die Suche nach kreativen Lösungen. Und vielleicht gilt es, zukünftige Workshops um eben diese Akteure zu erweitern.

Tim Schmalfeldt ist Referent im Fachbereich Multimedia bei der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung.

Open Education: Was ist das eigentlich?

Sarah Behrens über den Vortrag von Dr. Anja Wagner und Dr. Markus Deimann “Open Education als diskursives Feld – Regeln und Mechanismen”

Der Begriff Open Education ist im Bildungsbereich in aller Munde, wenn es darum geht dem Anspruch gerecht zu werden, Bildung frei zugänglich zu machen. Freie Bildungsmaterialien und frei zugängliche Lernplattformen tragen dazu bei, den Begriff Open Education mit Leben zu füllen. Dennoch bleibt Open Education ein weit gefasstes Feld variierender Sichtweisen, die nur schwer zu vereinheitlichen sind, so dass sich daraus ein gemeinsames Verständnis von offener Bildung ableiten lässt. Mit ihrem Vortrag zur OER-Konferenz 2014 möchten Dr. Anja Wagner (ununi.tv) und Dr. Markus Deimann (FernUniversität in Hagen) darlegen, welche Charakteristika für Open Education relevant sind und welche Rückschlüsse sich daraus auf gesellschaftliche Interessengruppen und das (gemeinsame) Verständnis von Open Education ziehen lassen. Grundlage für die Erkenntnisse ist die offen zugängliche Interview-Reihe “OpenEd” auf der Plattform ununi.tv, die seit Anfang 2014 verschiedene Akteure und Initiativen zur Diskussion über ihre bildungspolitischen Ideen und Ansätze bewegt. Für die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer der OERde14 bedeutet dies im Folgenden: Wie werden diese Erkenntnisse übermittelt?

Zunächst gilt es für den Vortrag von Dr. Anja Wagner und Dr. Markus Deimann folgende theoretische Annahme zu berücksichtigen: Betrachtet man Bildung als diskursives Feld, eröffnen sich Möglichkeiten zu erfahren, wie über Bildung gesprochen und welches Verständnis dabei von Bildung erzeugt wird. Wie kann das funktionieren? Ausgehend vom gesellschaftstheoretischen Begriff “diskursives Feld” im Foucaultschen Sinne wird Realität im Diskurs kontinuierlich erzeugt und strukturiert. Übertragen auf die Bildung bedeutet das, vereinfacht gesagt, dass im sprachlichen Austausch über bildungspolitische Ideen und Ansätze ein bestimmtes Verständnis von Bildung geschaffen wird. Gleichzeitig bedingen  Machtstrukturen und individuelle Interessen welche Vorstellungen von Bildung forciert werden. Das Verständnis von Bildung ist folglich abhängig von den jeweiligen Positionen der Akteure, die in der diskursiven Formation über Bildung diskutieren.

Welches Verständnis wird von Bildung auf der Plattform ununi.TV erzeugt? Auf der Plattform ununi.TV ist so ein diskursives Feld um das Thema Open Education entstanden. Allen Interessierten ist es über Live-Video-Formate und interaktive Workshop-Modelle auf dieser Plattform möglich, sich über Erfahrungen zum Thema Open Education auszutauschen, sich zu vernetzen und gemeinsam an Lösungsmodellen zu arbeiten. Wohin es im Einzelnen thematisch geht, bestimmen die daran Beteiligten selbst. Damit werden Freiräume, speziell Erfahrungsräume, geschaffen, in denen eigene Mechanismen regeln, wie im Diskurs über Bildung gesprochen wird.

Mit der offenen Interview-Reihe “OpenEd”, die auf der Plattform ununi.TV Anfang 2014 ins Leben gerufen wurde, soll dieses diskursive Feld um das Thema Open Education “entzaubert” werden. Verschiedene Akteure und Initiativen aus Politik, Wirtschaft und Bildung haben über “OpenEd” in Form von Live-Videos die Chance sich zu Themen rundum Open Education zu äußern, Problemfelder aufzuzeigen und Lösungsansätze vorzustellen. Auf der OER-Konferenz 2014 sollen im ersten Schritt sich daraus abzeichnende Regelmäßigkeiten, Prozeduren und Mechanismen analysiert und relevante Diskursstränge für Open Education identifiziert werden. Im zweiten Schritt werden charakteristische Muster abgeleitet und zusammengefasst präsentiert.

Insgesamt bietet der Vortrag auf der OERde14 von Dr. Anja Wagner und Dr. Markus Deimann nicht nur ein theoretisches Grundkonzept, Bildung im Rahmen von Open Education greifbarer zu machen, sondern auch konkrete Möglichkeiten, wie der damit verbundene bildungspolitische Diskurs aktiv mitbestimmt werden kann.

Sarah Behrens ist Werkstudentin bei Wikimedia Deutschland im Bereich Bildung & Wissen.

 

by Sebastian Horndasch at September 10, 2014 11:28 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

Wikimedia Foundation

Now available: Charting Diversity – Working together towards diversity in Wikipedia

The Compass of Diversity

(“Compass of diversity” by Wikimedia Deutschland, under CC-BY-SA-4.0)

Within the last couple of years, a discussion arose concerning the ratio of male to female contributors on Wikipedia. Various studies verified a significant gender gap within the group of editors. A number of countries have since started initiatives that specialize in supporting female contributors. These include events run by female Wikipedians like Netha Hussain in India and Emily Temple Wood in the U.S. These projects work towards increasing the number of women actively participating on Wikimedia projects.

In our recently published study, Charting Diversity, we identified additional instruments and field of actions that could have a positive effect on promoting gender diversity in editors. Two approaches are key: Developing an understanding and awareness on the subject of “diversity” within the community as well as nurturing and enhancing an open and a welcoming culture are highly important. As Lila Tretikov, executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation, and others said at this year’s Wikimania, the promotion of mutual respect and a positive communication culture are essential for Wikipedia. Another field of action is our research on the connection between diversity and quality of knowledge production. There are still many unanswered questions as to how socio-demographic diversity affects the content of Wikipedia articles.

Download as a pdf file (424 KB)

“Charting Diversity” by Ilona Buchem (Beuth Univ.), Antje Ducki (Beuth Univ.), Sarah Khayati (Beuth Univ.), Julia Kloppenburg (WMDE), Nils Weichert (WMDE) , under CC-BY-SA-4.0

Charting Diversity deals with diversity and its importance to Wikipedia, documenting our current knowledge on the matter, setting out fields of action and concluding with a catalogue of measures to serve as motivation for our future work.The study incorporates the opinions and ideas of male and female Wikipedians, gathered at numerous meetings, workshops and at the 2013 Wikimedia Diversity Conference in Berlin.

This year Wikimedia Deutschland implemented two tools as a consequence of the study “Charting Diversity,” in collaboration with male and female Wikipedians. One of these is cMOOCs (connectivist Massive Open Online Course) – these are open online workshop-style meetings. Under the title Wiki Dialogue, all Wikipedians and Wikipedia enthusiasts have the opportunity to address problematic issues on cooperation within the community and discuss them in a structured, time-restricted and solution-oriented way. The second tool is topic-specific female multiplier networks, which we are currently setting up. Under the title Women Edit, female Wikipedians can actively take part in projects that motivate targeted participation, while also exploring the Wikipedian communication culture. The first results are the “Women in Science” edit-a-thon and the WikiWomen meetings, as well as other events.

Charting Diversity was created as part of the Wikipedia Diversity project. The project was developed in collaboration with Prof. Ilona Buchem, guest professor in digital media and diversity at the Gender and Technology Center of Beuth University of Applied Sciences in Berlin. Anyone who wishes to order printed copies in English or German can write to us at bildung@wikimedia.de. The German version can be found here, while the English version is here.

We are looking forward to your questions and comments on Meta!

Happy reading!

Julia Kloppenburg (Wikimedia Deutschland)

by carlosmonterrey at September 10, 2014 01:05 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

September 09, 2014

Wikimedia Spain

Wikipedia en asturiano cumple diez años

Español

8 de septiembre de 2014, Oviedo

Los días 12 y 13 de septiembre la comunidad de usuarios de Wikipedia en Asturiano organiza, en colaboración con Wikimedia España, la celebración del décimo aniversario de la enciclopedia libre en asturleonés. Los actos tendrán lugar en el Auditorio Príncipe Felipe (Plaza La Gesta, Oviedo).

«Zazaki», la lengua hablada por una minoría étnica de Turquía, es el artículo en el que se hizo la primera edición de Wikipedia en lengua asturiana, era un 26 de julio de 2004. Diez años después ya cuenta con cerca 20.000 artículos y alrededor de 800.000 ediciones, números que siguen aumentando día a día gracias a la labor de decenas de voluntarios. Posteriormente nacerían las versiones en este idioma de otros proyectos hermanos, como Wikicionario, Wikisource y Wikiquote. Administrados por la Fundación Wikimedia, todos ellos forman parte de un movimiento surgido en enero de 2001, cuando nació Wikipedia, con el objetivo de divulgar de manera libre la suma del conocimiento humano.

Con motivo de ello, Wikipedia en asturiano y Wikimedia España llevan adelante unas jornadas para celebrar el aniversario y dar a conocer los proyectos Wikimedia en asturleonés. La asociación Wikimedia España (www.wikimedia.es) es una organización sin ánimo de lucro creada con el fin de favorecer el desarrollo del Conocimiento Libre promoviendo aquellos proyectos acogidos por la Fundación Wikimedia en todas las lenguas que se hablan en España.

En la primera jornada del viernes 12, a las 17:30 h, y tras un pequeño repaso de estos diez años, se realizará una charla de introducción al funcionamiento de Wikipedia, a la que seguirá un taller para aprender a editar en su versión en asturiano. El sábado 13 a las 11:00 h, dentro ya de la segunda jornada, se comenzará con un homenaje literario a Caitano Bardón (Carrizo, León, 1881), en colaboración con el colectivo Fame Poétika y la asociación Faceira radicada en León, durante el cual se leerán varios textos en asturleonés con el acompañamiento musical de Fran Allegre. Además, se presentará un Wikiproyecto sobre deporte en Asturias y se pondrá fin al evento con una Mesa Redonda sobre "Llingua y Medios". La entrada es libre y gratuita.

Asimismo, durante el fin de semana, Wikimedia España celebrará también su Asamblea Anual de Socios en Oviedo.

Asturianu

8 de setiembre de 2014, Uviéu

Los díes 12 y 13 de setiembre la comunidá d'usuarios de Wikipedia n'Asturianu organiza, en collaboración con Wikimedia España, la celebración del décimu aniversariu de la enciclopedia llibre n'asturllionés. Los actos tendrán llugar nel Auditoriu Príncipe Felipe (Plaza La Gesta, Uviéu) y cuntará con distintes actividaes.

«Zazaki» ye'l nome de la entrada de la primer edición d'un artículu na Wikipedia en llingua asturiana, yera un 26 de xunetu de 2004. Diez años dempués ésta cuenta yá con cerca 20.000 artículos y alredor de 800.000 ediciones, númberu que sigue aumentando día a día gracies al llabor de decenes de voluntarios. Posteriormente naceríen les versiones nesti idioma d'otros proyectos hermanos, como Wikicionariu, Wikisource y Wikiquote. Alministraos pola Fundación Wikimedia, toos ellos formen en conxuntu parte d'un movimientu surdíu en xineru de 2001 col oxetivu de divulgar de manera llibre la suma del conocimientu humanu.

Con motivu d'ello, Wikipedia n'asturianu y Wikimedia España entamen unes xornaes pa celebrar l'aniversariu y dar a conocer los proyectos Wikimedia n'asturllionés. L'asociación Wikimedia España (www.wikimedia.es) ye una organización ensin ánimu de llucru creada col fin de favorecer el desenrollu del Conocimientu Llibre promoviendo aquellos proyectos acoyíos pola Fundación Wikimedia en toles llingües que se falen n'España.

Na primer xornada del vienres 12, a les 17:30 h y tres un pequeñu repás d'estos diez años, realizaráse una charra d'introducción al funcionamientu de Wikipedia, a lo que siguirá un taller pa deprender a editar na so versión n'asturianu. El sábadu 13 a les 11:00 h, dientro yá de la segunda xornada, escomenzará con un homenaxe lliterariu a Caitano Bardón (Carrizu, Llión, 1881) en collaboración colos colectivos Fame Poétika y l'asociación Faceira, asitiada en Llión. Nésti lleeránse dellos testos n'asturllionés col acompañamientu musical de Fran Allegre. Arriendes d'ello, presentaráse un Wikiproyectu sobre deporte n'Asturies y pondráse fin al eventu con una Mesa Redonda sobre "Llingua y Medios". La entrada ye llibre y gratuita.

Asina, a lo llargo de la fin de selmana, Wikimedia España celebrará tamién la so Asamblea Añal de Socios en Uviéu.

by Santiago Navarro Sanz (noreply@blogger.com) at September 09, 2014 11:54 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Spain

Wikimedia Sweden

Slutspurt i Då och Nu

Efter en hel sommar av fototävlingen Då och Nu är det nu dags för slutspurt. Imorgon är sista dagen för uppladdning (du kan hålla på fram till 23.59 CEST). I skrivande stund är det ungefär 50 inskickade bilder som du har att tävla mot. Vi efterlyser framförallt bilder från Lunds och Umeå kommun där vi inte har fått några uppladdningar alls än, men som ingår i egna urvalsgrupper i chansen att bli utställd på Västerbottens museum. De andra urvalsgrupperna är kommunerna Göteborg, Stockholm och Kalmar samt resten av Sverige, så alla har chansen att vara med och tävla i slutspurten.

Guldheden

Till vänster: Guldhedstorget 1945 Foto: Fredrik Daniel Bruno Licens: Public Domain Till höger: Guldhedstorget 2011 Foto: Bengt A Lundberg Licens: CC BY 2.5

Tävlingen går alltså ut på som ovan att ta en ny version av en bild som finns i Europeanas databas. Du behöver inte göra ett collage som ovan, utan det är enbart din egna bild som du tävlar med. Bedömningskriterierna är att försöka efterlikna hur den första bilden har tagits, det vill säga stå på samma plats, ha ett liknande perspektiv och så vidare. I bilden till höger skulle man kunna förbättra perspektivet och beskärningen något. Innehållet i själva bilden kan däremot ha ändrat sig hur mycket som helst, det intressanta blir ju att kunna göra jämförelserna sida vid sida för att se skillnader eller likheter.

by Jan Ainali at September 09, 2014 03:22 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Sweden

Wikimedia Ukraine

Конкурс “Вікі любить пам’ятки” стартує через тиждень

Домівка > Некатегоризовано > Конкурс “Вікі любить пам’ятки” стартує через тиждень

Рівно через тиждень, 15 вересня 2014 року, стартує фотоконкурс “Вікі любить пам’ятки” – вже п’ятий у світі після дебюту в 2010 і третій в Україні, після дебюту в 2012. Пропонуємо Вашій увазі статтю в журналі “Культурі і життя” з цієї нагоди.

КіЖ1 КіЖ2

by Андрій Бондаренко at September 09, 2014 07:43 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Ukraine

Wikimedia DC

A weekend with Wikidata: The Open Government WikiHack, Part 2

The Open Government WikiHack will take place at the National Archives, September 27–28

Wikimedia DC held its first ever Open Government WikiHack this past April, at the offices of the Sunlight Foundation. We spent the weekend experimenting with open data repositories, including those made available by the Sunlight Foundation, trying to figure out how we can take this data and use it to improve Wikipedia. We imagined a world of Wikipedia articles that update automatically as new information comes to light. This month, we are going to continue imagining.

The link between Wikipedia and structured data is Wikidata, a fairly new project spearheaded by the Wikimedia Deutschland chapter. The basic principle is that while Wikipedia exists in over 200 languages, data exists as data regardless of language. For example, the population of South Africa is 54,002,000, according to a 2014 estimate. You can find this datum in the Wikipedia article on South Africa, alongside the right side of the article. You can also find data on South Africa in its Wikidata entry, Q258. In the long run, data used in Wikipedia articles will be fed out of Wikidata, rather than posted directly on each article, so that the data will be automatically available in the many language editions of Wikipedia.

Wikidata is fairly new to all of us, so we have invited James Forrester to give a presentation on Wikidata and how we can help improve it. Mr. Forrester is a product manager at the Wikimedia Foundation, focused on improving Wikipedia’s editing experience, and has also been a very active participant on Wikidata from the beginning. We are very excited to see him come to the National Archives and help us make Wikidata part of the broader Open Data conversation we’re having in the nation’s capital.

We would love to have you participate in our WikiHack, which will take place on September 27–28, regardless of experience with coding or editing Wikipedia. You can register for free at EventBrite. Hope to see you there!

 

by James at September 09, 2014 12:49 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia DC

September 08, 2014

Wikimedia Foundation

A Focused Approach for Maithili Wikipedia

Biplab Anand, a versatile contributor on Maithili and Nepdali Wikipedia and also the admin of the Facebook page on Maithili Wikipedia.

In June of 2014, the Wikimedia blog had an interview with Ram Prasad Joshi, a dedicated Wikipedian contributing in six languages – Nepali, Sanskrit, Hindi, Fiji Hindi, Bhojpuri and Gujarati from his unelectrified remote village in the Western hills of Nepal. A few days back, this linguist Wikipedian posted a message of appreciation on compatriot Biplab Anand’s Incubator talk page: “बिप्लवजी धन्यवाद यो विकिलाई बाहिर निकाल्ने प्रयास गर्नु पर्ने छ।” which translated states, “Biplab ji, thank you for the efforts to bring out this wiki” – referring to Biplab Anand’s dedicated approach in trying to transform Maithili Wikipedia from its current incubator status into a full-fledged Wikipedia. Apart from appreciation from several other Wikipedians, on August 17, 2014, Rajbiraj Today, a daily newspaper from Saptari, Nepal, carried a special feature highlighting the coordinated tasks accomplished by individuals such as Biplab Anand and Ganesh Paudel with a focus on the genesis of Maithili Wikipedia.

One of the strategies adopted in the effort to launch a Maithili Wikipedia has been the use of social media. Biplab Anand has created a Facebook page to spread awareness and educate the people on Maithili Wikipedia. At the time that I wrote this post, the page had garnered 116 likes. The next strategy adopted by Biplab was to post awareness messages for Maithili-knowing Wikipedians on other language Wikipedias where a substantial number of editors could also become aware of the language. As part of this strategy, a message was posted on the Hindi Wikipedia Village Pump. During Wikimania 2014, another Maithili Wikipedian, Ganesh Paudel, managed to meet MF-Warburg, the admin, bureaucrat and importer of Wikimedia Incubator and also the member of the Language Committee, to discuss ways of unleashing the potential of an independent Maithili Wikipedia (see this discussion).

Ganesh Paudel, one of the high profile contributors of the Maithili and Nepali Wikipedias.

As these developments were in progress, I interviewed both Biplab Anand and Ganesh Paudel about the path ahead via a questionnaire. Both expressed their concern over the fact that a separate Maithili Wikipedia does not exist despite the language being native to over 40 million people in both Nepal and India. As to whether a Maithili organization can possibly support the language Wikipedia the way Samskrita Bharati does for Sanskrit Wikipedia (see this blog post), it emerged that currently it is not possible to expect such a strong institutional support for the cause. However, Biplab mentioned the possibility of garnering support from Maithili Sahitya Parishad Saptari Nepal in organizing Maithili Wikipedia Outreach programs in Nepal.

Regarding the quality improvement in the current content and contributions, it was felt that most of the articles are currently stubs and need revision. Similarly, the present articles are generally focused on personalities and places. However, a page on the essential prerequisite articles has been created and it is expected that as more editors join the arena, articles on diverse topics such as medicine, history, engineering, etc will also gain momentum. The vast geographical area where Maithili is spoken has given rise to a number of distinctly identifiable but mutually intelligible dialects. Biplab suggested the use of the Kalyani Maithili Dictionary as a standard for the language. Ganesh has identified several online resources which can be particularly helpful to the editors in accomplishing their tasks such as Bataah Maithili, Vidyapati, Videha, Mithila News, Esamaad and Mithila Lok. He also suggested that the next Maithili project could be the language Wikisource to start the documentation of ancient works.

There is a spirit of achievement among the small but growing community of Maithili Wikipedians, who are currently between 50-60 in number. Biplab Anand confirmed the presence of more than 1000 articles on the Maithili Incubator Project on his Hindi Wikipedia talk page. On the other hand, Ganesh Paudel highlighted that his efforts are not ending by simply getting the Maithili Wikipedia out of the incubator as he is equally concerned about having independent Limbu, Gurung, Tamang and Awadhi Wikipedias. He also spoke about a self-confident approach as a key to success in his statement “if you want Wikipedia in your language come forth, you are the best one to contribute for the growth of your language.” An encouraging development in this context is the assurance by MF-Warburg: “I’ll be glad to approve this project when the activity criteria are met,” referring to the need for sustained editing activity by the dedicated contributors for the next few months to get Maithili Wikipedia as a live and thriving project in the coming months.

Syed Muzammiluddin, Wikipedian

by carlosmonterrey at September 08, 2014 11:15 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Ukraine

Конкурс “пишемо про НАТО” продовжено ще на тиждень.

Домівка > Конкурси > Конкурс “пишемо про НАТО” продовжено ще на тиждень.

Конкурс статей «Пишемо про НАТО», що триває в українській Вікіпедії з 4 серпня, продовжено ще на один тиждень – до 21 вересня, а кількість головних призів збільшено до трьох.

За словами кородиантора конкурсу, Павла Лакійчука, Конкурс “виявив велику зацікавленість тематикою НАТО та велику активність з боку дописувачів української Вікіпедії і, як наслідок, велику кількість нових статей, створених протягом понад місяця його проведення. Саме тому Центром інформації та документації НАТО в Україні та ГО «Вікімедіа Україна» було вирішено продовжити термін його проведення на тиждень – до 21 вересня 2014 року”.

Станом на 8 вересня кількість конкурсних статей перевищила 250. З них 34 описують військові операції НАТО, 13 – про діячів НАТО, 19 – про саміти НАТО. Декілька статей описують відносини НАТО і України, серед яких трапляються і злободенні – наприклад, “Міфи про НАТО” або “Ставлення політиків до членства України в НАТО”.  Не обходиться на жаль без любителів скопіювати і вставити готовий текст, але статті, створені методом “копіпейсту” у Вікіпедії вилучаються, тож їх “автори” на перемогу в конкурсі не матимуть жодних шансів. 

Нагадаємо, що головними призами конкурсу є поїздки до Брюселля з можливістю відвідати штаб-квартиру НАТО. Для перемоги в конкурсі слід набрати найбільшу кількість балів, які нараховуються відповідно до об’єму статті (в байтах) помноженого на середню оцінку членів журі. 

Categories: Конкурси Теґи:

by Андрій Бондаренко at September 08, 2014 09:37 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Ukraine

Wikimedia France

5e édition de Wiki Loves Monuments

COMMUNIQUÉ DE PRESSE

5e édition de Wiki Loves Monuments,

le plus grand concours de photos au monde

Le 8 septembre 2014

en lire plus

by admin at September 08, 2014 03:18 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia France

Wikimedia Germany

Digitale Kompetenzen die dritte: Digitalisierung der Arbeitswelt – Zwischen Kollaboration und Selbstausbeutung

Am 29. September geht die Veranstaltungsreihe “Digitale Kompetenzen” in die dritte Runde. Nachdem wir in den vorangegangen Veranstaltungen über Datenschutzbewusstsein und den Begriff der Digital Natives gesprochen haben, wollen wir uns nun kritisch mit den grundlegenden Veränderungen der Arbeitswelt durch die zunehmende Digitalisierung und den damit verbundenen Folgen auseinandersetzen.

Broschüre zur Veranstaltungsreihe herunterladen

Innovationen innerhalb der Mobiltechnologie und kollaborative Arbeitswerkzeuge vereinfachen die Arbeit und ermöglichen flexible Arbeitszeiten und -orte, wovon besonders Familien profitieren. Die Kehrseite besteht jedoch in einem zunehmenden Zerfließen der Grenze von Arbeit und Privatleben durch ständige Erreichbarkeit. Erst vor kurzem hatte die Bundesarbeitsministerin Andrea Nahles die Prüfung einer “Anti-Stress-Verordnung” auf Bundesebene gefordert, um ArbeitnehmerInnen besser vor psychischen Belastungen schützen zu können. Das Unternehmen Daimler ermöglicht seinen Mitarbeitenden seit August 2014, E-Mails während des Urlaubs löschen zu lassen. Die Veranstaltung möchte sich daher der Frage widmen, wie einschneidend die mit den neuen digitalen Technologien einhergehenden Veränderungen in der Arbeitsorganisation und im Arbeitshandeln sind. Welche Konsequenzen ergeben sich für das Individuum? Öffnen diese Veränderungen Tür und Tor für Dauerstress? Ist es für Arbeitgeber überhaupt sinnvoll, wenn Mitarbeitende nahezu durchgehend arbeiten? Brauchen wir einen digitalen Arbeitsschutz und können kollaborative Arbeitssysteme wie sie Wikipedia nutzt Vorbild für ein neue Art des Zusammenarbeitens sein?

Sabria David vom Slow Media Institut wird in ihrem einführenden Vortrag über die Veränderungen durch zunehmende Digitalisierung der Arbeitswelt sprechen und vorstellen, wie ein digitaler Arbeitsschutz präventiv wirken kann.Anschließend wollen wir uns im Rahmen einer moderierten Podiumsdiskussion den oben genannten Fragen widmen. Zu Gast ist Prof. Dr. Tim Hagemann von der Fachhochschule der Diakonie in Bielefeld, der zu Organisationsentwicklung, Psychischer Belastung und Beanspruchung, Stress & Burnout und der betrieblichen Gesundheitsförderung forscht.

Wie immer werden wir für diejenigen, die nicht persönlich vor Ort sein können, einen Livestream auf der Webseite der Veranstaltung anbieten. Via Twitter können unter dem Hashtag #DigiKompz Fragen und Anmerkungen übersendet werden. Außerdem bietet die Diskussionsseite Raum für eigene Beiträge zu dem Thema.

  • Ort: Wikimedia Deutschland e.V., Tempelhofer Ufer 23-24, 10963 Berlin
  • Uhrzeit: 19:00 Uhr – ca. 21:30 Uhr
  • Anmeldung: Die Veranstaltung ist kostenfrei, über eine Anmeldung freuen wir uns jedoch.

by Christopher Schwarzkopf at September 08, 2014 12:24 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

Outreach Program for Women at Wikidata

German summary: Im Mai beteiligte sich Wikidata am Outreach Program for Women. Helen Halbert und Anjali Sharma kümmerten sich um die Dokumentation von Wikidata für die Öffentlichkeit und Community, von Guided Tours, die an Wikidata heranführen bis zum Befüllen der Social-Media-Kanäle. Der folgende Gastbeitrag auf Englisch wurde von Helen (zusammen mit Anjali) nach ihrer Teilnahme an dem Programm bei uns verfasst.


This May, Wikidata was part of the Outreach Program for Women. Helen Halbert and Anjali Sharma took care of documenting Wikidata for the general public and the community, with tasks ranging from guided tours for those new to Wikidata to handling the various social media channels. The following guest post is a summary by Helen (written together with  Anjali) about her time with Wikidata.

The journey to contributor

This past May, Anjali and myself were thrilled to learn we both would be working for Wikidata for the summer as part of GNOME Foundation’s Outreach Program for Women (OPW), which provides paid internships with participating organizations to encourage more women to get involved with free and open source software. Both of us were assigned the task of working on outreach efforts.

Apart from dipping our toes briefly into the project while applying to the program, we were newcomers to Wikidata—although not technical projects.

Anjali, a student in Information Technology at the Indian Institute of Information Technology with an interest in software architecture, and I, a recent graduate of UBC’s library and information studies program, were both familiar with linked, structured data and concepts like authority control. But despite this technical and theoretical understanding, when we both reflected back to our first encounters with Wikidata, we recalled how it had taken a few re-reads of the Glossary (and the Wikipediapages, and some of the Help pages…. ) before fully coming to terms with what the project was all about.

This challenge of communicating what Wikidata is and does was essentially the motivation behind our two internships. While Wikidata is an impressive and important undertaking—made all the more so because it’s a product of volunteer contributors—the project presented a barrier to participation, even to those from a technical background, let alone someone who didn’t already know what structured data is or why they should care about it.

In some keys ways, this is where being a newcomer to the Wikidata community had its advantages.

Because neither Anjali nor I had expertise with the project, or a long-standing familiarity with the way the software worked, it meant that we weren’t blind to our own intimate knowledge of Wikidata and wouldn’t take for granted or assume that what we knew was a level of understanding common to everyone. This was definitely an asset while writing documentation! I tended to approach a lot of my work from a starting point of first addressing my own sources of confusion, and second, finding reason behind how and why the different parts of Wikidata fit together to make structured data a powerful tool for human knowledge.

Being a newcomer also has its own set of challenges. Updates to documentation sometimes required a lot of reading and research on my own part, and I often found myself not only consulting other pages on Wikidata and Wikimedia projects, but archived mailinglist messages and Project chat discussions, as well as my mentor and other contributors on the IRC channel.  Anjali too had a similar experience while creating content for slideshow tutorials and resources primarily intended as an orientation to the basics of Wikidata. Her undertaking also involved a lot of reading, research, and consultation to suss out the major obstacles and common difficulties faced by newcomers, as well as effective solutions and available strategies as suggested by other contributors. Yet another challenge was encountered by Anjali while she worked on new headers for Wikidata’s social media profiles—previous to the OPW internship, she had little idea of the complexity of copyright, but quickly came to terms with the various issues involved when navigating the murky waters of image rights.

Newcomers anywhere always run the risk of feeling like they are outsiders. Luckily, Anjali and myself both felt welcome by the Wikidata community, and while we were amazed and appreciative of everyone’s patience and generosity who worked with us, we both still found it difficult at first to follow the flow of community conversations—from the Project Chat and mailinglists, to the talk pages, and RFCs—and to be bold; this was especially true at the beginning, when I found myself updating Help pages, crossing my fingers and hoping that they would be seen as improvements by the community.

While we endeavoured to work as openly as possible by keeping a public work plan, first announcing intentions at Project Chat and then proposed changes on talk pages, and requesting and responding to feedback from the community—it was never clear how to weigh feedback when there were either comments with conflicting opinions or too few to go by to form the basis of a decision.

In my experience, I found the best way to mediate this discomfort was gradually by getting to know other contributors through their interests, passions, and strengths, and by collaborating with them on specific initiatives. It goes without saying that Anjali, through her analysis, and then promotion, of candidate items for Showcase status, and research into past Wikidata content that generated the most page views and interest on social media platforms, also developed a very good idea of what excites and engages the Wikidata community.

We both enjoyed seeing the community grow in the short few months of our internship. From the buzz that built up just prior to Wikimania, to the new properties, WikiProjects, and initiatives like the Wikidata Lounge that were proposed by one or two people and then quickly took on a life of their own—it was clear that feeling part of the community was important motivation for contributors who kept coming back to Wikidata.

These experiences and reflections influenced the way we approached outreach efforts as well as thought about how to create meaningful, sustainable pathways for newcomers to get involved with Wikidata.

Helen:

  • authored content for a series of GuidedTours interactive tutorials (two have been deployed, others are in the works);
  • updated all of the pages in the Help namespace (and created some new ones where there were gaps in the documentation;
  • aggregated and improved common content related to sister projects integration;
  • planned and implemented a new Main page;
  • made efforts to provide more opportunities for those interested in non-technical contributors by updating the Contribute portal, creating a task list, and planning related WikiProjects

Anjali:

  • analyzed Wikidata social media profiles to determine content that generated the most interest;
  • designed new headers for Wikidata social media profiles;
  • created a Wikidata Facebook group for college youth to provide regular updates pertaining to work happening around Wikidata;
  • developed a social media calendar for scheduling Twitter updates and populated the calendar with ideas for content;
  • developed a slideshow resource for use in Wikidata-related events;
  • brainstormed ideas and drafted a proposal for holding regular interactive discussions on social media platforms;
  • and translated some of the GuidedTours content into Hindi;

by Jens Ohlig at September 08, 2014 09:49 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

Wikimedia Serbia

„Вики воли Земљу“ у Нишу

Београд, 8. септембар 2014. Изложба „Вики воли Земљу“ стигла је и до Ниша. У понедељак, 15. септембра од 18 часова, у просторијама Друштва архитеката Ниша (Генерала Милојка Лешјанина 52) у Нишу, одржаће се отварање још једне у низу изложби победничких фотографија такмичења Вики Воли Земљу (Wiki loves Earth). Изложба ће трајати седам дана. Такмичење је […]

by IvanaMadzarevic at September 08, 2014 07:49 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Serbia

Wikimedia Spain

¡Feliz cumpleaños Wikimedia Commons!

Logo de Wikimedia Commons Efectivamente, ya son 10 los años que han pasado desde que Wikimedia Commons, el repositorio para archivos multimedia y documentos de la Fundación Wikimedia, viera la luz.

Wikimedia Commons es hoy, con más de 22 millones de archivos, un repositorio de referencia mundial con material educativo e íntegramente publicado con licencias libres. Pero el mérito de Wikimedia Commons no es el haber recopilado todo ese material, sino más bien la forma en la que se ha hecho: gracias a la dedicación de decenas de miles de voluntarios de todo el mundo que lo han subido al repositorio para que pueda ser utilizado por el resto de proyectos de la Fundación, tal y como hace Wikipedia, o bien para que se use fuera del ámbito de los proyectos Wikimedia.

Una de las campañas que ayudan a proveer de contenido a Wikimedia Commons es Wiki Loves Monuments, el mayor concurso fotográfico del mundo, que desde 2010 ha recopilado 900 000 imágenes de todo el mundo, y que está ahora mismo celebrando una nueva edición (¡sí!, ¡aún estás a tiempo de subir fotos de monumentos hasta el 30 de septiembre!), pero la mayor aportación es la de los voluntarios del movimiento Wikimedia, que comparten recursos cada día.

Otra de las fuentes de material son la cantidad de acuerdos con instituciones culturales (GLAM) de todo el mundo que han cedido parte de sus obras al conocimiento libre. El mantenimiento necesario para manejar toda esta información y evitar, por ejemplo, que material que no goza de una licencia libre esté disponible en el proyecto, son de nuevo los miembros de Wikimedia Commons, tal y como destaca Erik Moeller, colaborador entonces y director adjunto de la Fundación hoy, quien propuso la creación de Wikimedia Commons en marzo de 2004.

A continuación te mostramos algunas de las imágenes de Wikimedia Commons
Madre exiliada, obra de Dorothea Lange, en Dominio Público.
“NTS Barrage Balloon”, obra del Departamento de Energía de los Estados Unidos, en Dominio Público.
Dos ejemplares de mariposa Dryas iulia bebiendo las lágrimas de tortugas en Ecuador, obra de amalavida.tv, CC-BY-SA 2.0.
Cañón Antílope, obra de Meckimac, CC BY-SA 3.0.
Célebre autoretratro de un macaco negro crestado (Macaca nigra) en Célebes Septentrional, Indonesia, tras hacerse con la cámara del fotógrafo David Slater y tomarse una fotografía de sí mismo, en Dominio Público.

¿Te quedas con ganas de hacerte una idea de la calidad de las fotografías que puedes encontrar en Wikimedia Commons? Aquí tienes una selección de las mejores imágenes

Entrada del blog de la Fundación: https://blog.wikimedia.org/2014/09/05/celebrating-the-10th-anniversary-of-wikimedia-commons/

by Diego Delso (noreply@blogger.com) at September 08, 2014 01:16 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Spain

September 07, 2014

Wikimedia Serbia

Први Вики камп 2014. је успешно завршен

У циљу бољег умрежавања и развијања добрих односа између огранака, ове године одржан је први Вики камп од 22. до 24. августа у организацији Викимедије Србије и Викимедије Мађарске. Последњег викенда августа, на Палићу и у Сегедину окупило се 17 волонтера из Србије и 3 волонтера из Мађарске. Три дана, два места, 20 мотивисаних учесника […]

by IvanaMadzarevic at September 07, 2014 03:39 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Serbia

September 06, 2014

Wikimedia Foundation

Will you join in celebrating the 10th anniversary of Wikimedia Commons?

Commons logo

Wikimedia Commons is turning 10 years old this Sunday — will you help celebrate? We’re asking everyone to join the Wikimedia community by sharing a freely licensed image with world.

Wikimedia Commons is one of the world’s largest resources of freely licensed educational media. It is the central repository of the majority of illustrations for Wikipedia, and it includes more than 22 million images of everything from the first human flight to the last of the quaggas. Historical treasures, like an 8th century Chinese star map, can be found alongside the most recent stars of the annual Eurovision song contest.

You can find the images on Commons illustrating the articles on Wikipedia, as the photographs in your newspapers, and as diagrams in your school projects. They are always freely licensed, and include the contributions of individual amateur photographers alongside donations from the collections of the world’s leading archives.

All this is possible thanks to the incredible work of the volunteer Wikimedia Commons community. Over ten years, four million registered users have uploaded the images and other media, curated licensing and attribution information, created categories, organized metadata, and removed non-educational content or images that are not freely licensed.[1] In addition to their work on-wiki, these volunteers have inspired partnerships with leading cultural institutions in order to make even more images and media available to the world.

The very first photograph uploaded to Wikimedia Commons (

The very first photograph uploaded to Wikimedia Commons (“Quail1.PNG “ by Node, today under CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Wikimedia Commons officially launched on September 7th, 2004, with an informal email to a Wikimedia mailing list. The note, which pointed users to commons.wikimedia.org, expressed a vague hope that someday the project would “get[s] its own domain.” (We’re happy to say that it’s still right there!) That same day, user:Node_ue uploaded the very first photograph, a snapshot of two wild Gambel’s quail, taken while they “happen[ed] to be eating birdseed in my parents’ backyard.”

The creation of Commons had been suggested by then-volunteer Wikimedian Erik Moeller (today the deputy director of the Wikimedia Foundation). His initial March 2004 proposal for a central repository for images, public domain texts, and other freely licensed documents expressed the hope that Commons could “provide the largest such repository of freely licensed material, with a quality control mechanism” — the Wikimedia community itself – “that other projects lack.”

The years since have witnessed creativity, collaborations, and even competitions — all originating from the Commons community — , evidence that its initial vision has become reality.

Over the past decade, the Commons community has greatly expanded the depth, content, and availability of photographs, historical documents, and other materials through partnerships with cultural institutions, known to Wikimedians as GLAMs (for Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums). Donations from organizations such as the French National Library and the German National Archives have added priceless educational and cultural richness to Wikimedia Commons. This past summer, the U.S. National Archives, having already provided more than 100,000 images, announced its intention to upload all of its holdings to Commons.

Wikimedia Commons is also the home of the community-created Wiki Loves Monuments competition, now in its fifth year and currently inviting entries until the end of September. Wiki Loves Monuments, which asks people from around the globe to share images of their cultural heritage, including historic buildings, monuments, and other creations, has been recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest photo competition in the world.

We’re celebrating these and many more achievements and milestones on this 10th anniversary, and we’re asking you to celebrate with us. How can you get started? There’s a good guide here, but in general Commons is always looking for freely-licensed images that are not yet part of its collection, especially high quality images for Wikipedia articles that don’t yet have illustrations, or images of notable people, places, or historic events. If you don’t have a freely-licensed image of your own to share, you may want to consider starting a conversation with your local cultural institution about how they might contribute their collection to Commons.

By sharing appropriate images under a free license, you’re becoming a member of the Commons community of creators and curators, and ensuring the project’s strength for another decade to come.

Lila Tretikov, Executive Director

  1. In doing so, Wikimedia Commons volunteers have become well acquainted with the intricacies of international copyright law (did you know that users have researched and documented the “freedom of panorama” regulations for 147 countries on Commons?). The Commons’ community’s careful curation of images is evidenced by the extremely low number of copyright takedown requests received by the Foundation each year, as documented in our recently released transparency report.

 
A selection of images from Wikimedia Commons (you can also browse through the full collection of 6,389 Featured Pictures – images that the community has chosen to be highlighted as some of the finest on Commons):

by carlosmonterrey at September 06, 2014 04:38 AM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

September 05, 2014

Wikimedia Foundation

Wiki Loves Monuments 2014 has begun!

Calling all photographers! It’s that time of year again: Wiki Loves Monuments 2014 has begun! On Monday, September 1, for the fifth consecutive year, participants from around the world began competing in the world’s largest photography competition, which will last until the end of September. Like before, photos captured will be uploaded to Wikimedia Commons, which will be celebrating its 10th anniversary this coming Sunday, September 7th. The competition is driven by volunteers in an effort to document different cultural heritages online, boost participation in Wikimedia projects and – of course – illustrate Wikipedia articles.

Throughout the month, participants will upload their photos to Wikimedia Commons under a free license. These submissions will then be judged within their country to determine the best of that country. Judges of each country have until the end of the month of October to select the top 10 winning photos, where they will be submitted to an international panel for selection as the best overall. Winners are typically announced in early December. Past winning submissions have come from Switzerland (2013), India (2012), Romania (2011) and the Netherlands (2010).

Over the years, WLM has grown significantly. First started in 2010 in the Netherlands, the first competition yielded more than 12,500 pictures of Dutch monuments alone. The following year, a total of 18 countries throughout Europe participated, netting 168,208 photographs – a Guinness World Record for the largest photography competition. Last year, there were over 365,000 submissions to Wikimedia Commons, obliterating the record from the year before.

This year at least 37 countries from 5 continents are participating, with various countries making their WLM debut. Long-time participants include Estonia, France, Germany, Poland, Romania and Switzerland, which will be joined for the first time by Iraq, Ireland, Lebanon, Macedonia and Pakistan.

Map of countries participating in Wiki Loves Monuments 2014.

“Despite having financial and social challenges, the Pakistani people are embracing the Internet and the growth rate of Internet users is on the rise,” says Saqib Qayyum, an active Wikimedian from Pakistan in a recent interview with Creative Commons. Saqib has high hopes for Pakistan’s first time in WLM:

“I believe once people participate in Wiki Loves Monuments Pakistan they will eventually start to contribute to Wikipedia, which is amongst the most successful products of the open and free internet. Thus, they will eventually come to learn about the concept of free culture movement. Wiki Loves Monuments Pakistan is the best, quickest and easiest way to introduce the free culture movement to the country.”

After all, he concludes, it may be challenging at times for many people to create a Wikipedia article, but “it’s pretty simple, fun and easy to take a photograph and upload it.”

The main organizer of Wiki Loves Monuments, (user:Romaine), holds similar hopes and goals as Saqib, particularly when it comes to coverage of countries from the Global South, which are inequitably represented.

“I noticed looking on Commons for photos of some new countries that these had almost no photos. Wiki Loves Monuments is changing that now and we are able to expand our visual knowledge in these countries with this contest. That is amazing.”

“Wiki Loves Monuments helps all the participating countries to have better coverage, but it is also a step in the right direction for helping those specifically lacking in coverage, especially in the Global South. Still many countries are missing in this year’s contest, as last year’s and year before that. Wiki Loves Monuments has just started, but we should already be thinking on how we can reach out to countries which have not participated before and how we can create the opportunity to get them involved,” he concludes. Whether you are participating from the Austria or Azerbaijan, Poland or Palestine, WLM is one way to help bridge the North-South Divide.

“We all need to play our part in ensuring a bright future for the open and free internet. I think the success of the movement globally depends on participation of people from not only the developed countries but also from the Global South”.

So go, get your camera and snap away. Also, stay up-to-date with the latest statistics from the competition here.

For the past winning photographs, see the list below.

Michael Guss, Communications Volunteer

2013 WLM winner. A RhB Ge 4/4 II with a push–pull train crosses the Wiesen Viaduct between Wiesen and Filisur, Switzerland (“RhB Ge 4-4 II Wiesener Viadukt” by Kabelleger, under CC-BY-SA-3.0)

2011 WLM winner. Winter picture of Chiajna Monastery (“Mănăstirea Chiajna – Giulești” by Mihai Petre, under CC-BY-SA-3.0-RO). The monastery is situated on the outskirts of Bucharest.

2010 WLM winner. Vijzelstraat 31 in Amsterdam. (“Amsterdam – Vijzelstraat 27-35 (halsgevel)” by Rudolphous, under CC-BY-SA-3.0-NL)

by carlosmonterrey at September 05, 2014 08:17 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Germany

Ein Beginn, der schon lange vorher begonnen hat – erstes Guide-Camp in Kassel

Am letzten August-Wochenende fand in Kassel das erste Guide-Camp zur nichtadministatriven Konfliktbewältigung in der Wikipedia statt. Die Wikipedianerin Kritzolina nahm dort als Teilnehmerin statt und veröffentlichte ihre Erfahrungen im Wikipedia:Kurier, dem internen Mitteilungsblatt der Wikipedia-Community. Wir freuen uns, diesen Text auch hier im Blog veröffentlichen zu können.

Die Teilnehmerin und die Teilnehmer des Guide-Camps. By Informationswiedergutmachung (Own work) CC-BY-SA-4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Als Neuwikipedianerin war ich in Kassel erstmals auf einem Arbeitstreffen der Wikipedia-Community. Ich war rundum angetan – von der guten Atmosphäre in der Gruppe, der Vorbereitung, der guten Versorgung und nicht zuletzt von der intensiven inhaltlichen Arbeit an einem sehr komplexen Thema. Ich finde, wir haben Ergebnisse, die sich sehen lassen können – auch wenn die Umsetzung der unterschiedlichen Ideen zur Konfliktbearbeitung in der Wikipedia sicher noch viel Arbeit und viele Unterstützer braucht.

Zunächst bekamen wir am Freitag einen sehr fundierten Vortrag von Benno Heussen zum Thema ”Zielkonflikte oder Machtkonflikte? Streitkultur bei Wikipedia”. Dabei wurden uns Grundsätze für das Konfliktmanagement an anschaulichen Praxisbeispielen erklärt und Theorien wie das Harvard-Konzept vorgestellt. Danach gab es einen lebendigen Dialog mit dem Referenten, bei dem wir die Inhalte seines Vortrages auf Wikipediatauglichkeit hinterfragen konnten. So kamen wir auf die Problematik der „offenen Systeme“ zu sprechen, in denen nicht immer offen mit Macht umgegangen wird; auf das Thema von Gefühlen und Gefühlskontrolle als Schlüssel zu Konfliktlösungen und auf die Frage, was wir als Autoren denn von der Wikipedia haben. Am späten Abend gab es noch einige interessante Erkenntnisse: Uns wurde bewusst…

… dass die Abwehrhaltung gegenüber Neuerungen in der Community möglicherweise der Selbststabilisierung des offenen Systems Wikipedia dient; alternativ, dass uns eine gesunde Streitkultur fehlt und Gefühle oft negiert anstatt ausgesprochen werden. Es blieben viele Fragen offen, vor allem zum Umgang mit Neulingen, mit Anerkennung und Stolz unter dem Mantel der Anonymität u.v.m.

Am Samstag wählten wir aus der Vielzahl der Themen einige aus, die wir dann in kleineren Arbeitsgruppen diskutierten, bearbeiteten, wieder in Unterpunkte zerlegten, nochmal ausdiskutierten – aber erfreulicherweise nie völlig zerredeten.
… das ist übrigens etwas, was mich wirklich faszinierte: All die doch so unterschiedlichen Wikicharaktere, die da in Kassel aufeinander trafen, arbeiteten sehr konstruktiv, effektiv und zielorientiert zusammen. Die aktuell brennenden Konflikte (Stichwort Superprotect) fanden ebenso Eingang in die Gespräche wie die altbekannten Dauerbrenner (Stichwort z.&nbsp;B.  Kreuz/Stern/gestorben). Sie wurden als Beispiele analysiert, unsere Ideen an ihrer Umsetzbarkeit in solchen Fällen gemessen, aber wir verloren uns nie in den – an anderer Stelle geführten – Endlosdebatten. Nach einem kurzen, aber guten Mittagessen fassten wir zunächst im Plenum die Ergebnisse zusammen und setzten dann am Nachmittag die Kleingruppenarbeit in veränderten Gruppen fort.

Am Sonntag konnten wir bei erstaunlich vielen Punkten darüber reden, ”wie” und ”wann” ”wer” die Umsetzung voranbringen sollte. Ein paar Themen, wie z.B. die Frage, ob wir eine Vergessenskultur in der Wikipedia brauchen, wurden auf die eher lange Bank gestellt. Bei anderen Fragen, die wir geschlossen für sehr sinnvoll hielten, wie z. ;B. die Einrichtung einer Ombudsstelle für (fast) alle Konflikte, diskutierten wir, ob für uns vorstellbar ist, die dafür erforderlichen Änderungen in Struktur und Reglement der Wikipedia gestalten zu können – und vor allem natürlich darüber, ob das, was wir für nützlich und sinnvoll halten, denn auch vom Rest der Community akzeptiert würde. Seid also nicht überrascht, wenn in der nächsten Zeit einige Umfragen gestartet werden oder wir auf Stammtischen und der WikiCon über Themen rund um die Konfliktbewältigung diskutieren wollen. Um mitreden zu können, empfehlen wir, sich schon jetzt damit zu beschäftigen, … Aber bitte habt Geduld, wenn dieses oder jenes Projektdetail noch „im Fluss“ ist.

(Das Konzentrat der Projektdetails soll hier erscheinen (in Arbeit).)

Einige Anmerkungen zum Text durch Dirk Franke: “Superprotect” bezieht sich auf das im August durch die Wikimedia Foundation eingeführte Recht, bestimmte Seiten auch für Administratorinnen und Administratoren der Wikipedia sperren zu lassen und nur einer kleinen durch die Wikimedia Foundation ausgewählten Zahl von Menschen dort Bearbeitungsmöglichkeiten zu geben. Dieses ist in der Community stark umstritten und wird von einer überwiegenden Zahl der Communitymitglieder abgelehnt. ” Kreuz/Stern/gestorben” bezieht sich auf die Auseinandersetzung innerhalb der Wikipedia-Community ob das Kreuz (†) generell als Zeichen für ein Sterbedatum adequat ist, oder ob dies bei Nicht-Christen durch ein andere Symbol ersetzt werden sollte.

by Dirk Franke at September 05, 2014 02:49 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

September 04, 2014

Wikimedia Foundation

Sixty ways to help new editors

Discussion in the Wikimania Discussion Room

Last August, Iolanda Pensa and I had the honor to facilitate a discussion at the Wikimania Discussion Room on the topic of Welcoming and retaining new users. This discussion was set up as a brainstorm session, and was one of the more rewarding experiences I had during Wikimania. In the session we focused on ideas on how we as a community can help new users become and remain involved. I hope that some of the ideas will be inspiring to you!

The round table discussion took place during Wikimania and was self-selected. Everyone was welcome to join, there was no expert panel and there was little preparation. The goal of the discussion was to come up with 30 ways to help new users on Wikimedia projects become and remain involved. We wanted ideas that did not depend on the Wikimedia Foundation or affiliate organizations, or on developers. I’m very glad to be able to say that 60 ways to help new users were shared – no doubt with some overlap, but still remarkable! At the end of the discussion we asked every participant to make a commitment for the coming month on how they would personally implement some of the 60 different methods to help new users.

The ideas brought forward were all over the place. You can find the original list in the discussion notes. In this post I would like to share an abridged list, where some points are merged and clarified.

I encourage every experienced user to browse through this list and explore the different ideas. Similarly to the participants in the discussion, please commit to one of them in the coming weeks – if you want, you can do so publicly by posting a comment on this blog post. Your commitment might serve as encouragement for others to do the same!

Lodewijk Gelauff, facilitator of the Wikimania Discussion Room and volunteer at Wikimedia Netherlands

Mentorship:

  • Form tandems between experienced editors and newcomers.
  • Mentorship space/program. Contributors may be matched to new users based on similarity of interests (enwiki).

Welcoming:

  • Send a welcome message, with a direct contact link. For example: “Hello, I’m Trizek, please contact me if you need assistance.”
  • Use Snuggle – A tool for experienced editors to welcome good faith newcomers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Snuggle
  • Join the “Teahouse” (enwiki; hewiki).
  • Find people who are willing and able to communicate in a friendly way – and new users should be channeled to them (where do I land after I created an account?)
  • It’s better to help five new users in a personalized way than to post 50 welcoming templates.
  • Organize/attend in-person meetups to help address the gap between ideal (“anyone can edit”) and reality (“it is tough”) – meetings that can be attended by new users.
  • Invite the new users to meetups – meet the contributors – put faces behind username.

Do not bite the newcomers:

  • Slow down the medium experienced users (~6 months of experience) that are overly enthusiastic and tend to ‘bite’ new users.
  • Rewrite messages into apologies (“we’re sorry if we didn’t understand what you intended; we had to revert your change”).
  • When interacting with new users, be more friendly.
  • Take “don’t bite the newbies” more seriously. Introduce (or enforce) a punishment for biting new users.
  • French Wikipedia had a message with a shark – “you have bitten a newbie” (no more biting newbies at fr.wp now, template has been deleted…)

Less is more:

  • Write shorter and clearer help and welcome messages with clear links. Help pages with 20 links are too much – a two sentence help message is better.
  • Make less use of templates in communication with new users; take more personalized action.
  • Reduce the number of rules (Ignore all rules at enwiki)

Give assignments:

  • Deliberately seeding small errors that are easy to fix. Or perhaps make them on sandbox/non article space? (Wikipedia adventure does that).
  • Organize a Wikipedia semi-regular scavenger hunt. Ask people to fulfill simple tasks, like “fix a dead link,” “fix a grammatical error” and reward them for that.
  • Provide a list of articles that new users can try to edit. (supposedly there’s an example of this on enwiki).
  • Give new users a list of assignments to do. Work queues that people can pick from, based on their interests.
  • Encourage people to play “The wikipedia adventure” (enwiki), or “the tourist bus” (cawiki).
  • More ways to contribute that are safe and have less drama – not only article creation/editing, like images, geo location, more fact checking, cleanup, checking external dead links.
  • Encourage micro editing thorough games.
  • Invite new users to advance in the stages of micro games.

Better training:

  • Produce and share a video of a new user seeing a mistake, going in and fixing it.
  • Set up some form of online training course on how to be a Wikipedia contributor.
  • Train experienced Wikipedians on how to welcome to new users.
  • Training in social manners/communication for experienced users and admins!

Better communication/documentation:

  • Reinforce that edits are live and seen by the whole world, use that as an intrinsic motivation.
  • Make visible how much training in editing someone has. Positive reinforcement for users investing – a progress bar to show how experienced they are.
  • Create a link page from which there is a an organised link tree to ALL possible instructions that the new user never finds.
  • Explain the basic principles of Wikipedia / Wikimedia projects in a friendly and understandable manner even if it is obvious to you and create instruction pages where these are explained in an understandable way.
  • Re-educate experienced users to use more friendly communication.
  • Give credit for being friendly to newbies, recognition, (gamification here?).
  • Encourage the use of discussion pages.
  • we need a much better manual and shorter summarized rule book (each rule is 8 pages long) – every rule should be a single sentence – and then put all nutshells in one page (“WP:Plain and simple” on enwiki?)
  • New editors want to create articles – and the feedback comes after weeks – speed up the process of checking new articles and giving feedback and improve the quality of the feedback.

Positive reinforcement:

  • Giving new editors recognition or a reward or a badge to show that they have learned something – a barnstar that you get for learning something – and each time you learn something the barnstar gets bigger. (example from enwiki) This may expand to include recognition of experienced users who complete education in nonviolent/civil communication or provide hospitality to new users.
  • Show after a week or month how many people saw the change and were positively affected.
  • Monthly emails showing how many people read the page you edited and used your knowledge, with a message like “the change you have made helped this amount of people.”
  • Give a “thumbs up” even for little things – Use ‘Thank you’ button right next to editor contributions.
  • Give recognition of outstanding edits (example dewiki: three level “barnstar type”).
  • Community post “achievement of the week” (enwiki).
  • Choose “contributor of the month” or “of the year” by the community.
  • More motivating messages – we are used to saying “work not good” but don’t get exercise giving out more positive messages.

Other:

  • Consider the expectations and the clash between expectations and reality – find ways to measure why new contributors leave.
  • Be sensitive to the different types of problems in different wiki’s – because every community has a different size and history, they work differently.
  • Recruit new people (events, museums, schools…)
  • Place a banner on Wikipedia with an explicit invitation to edit: if you want to edit follow this link and people are invited to meetup (But this should be displayed as part of the software, not an advertisement).
  • Do better research on why people do not edit even if they want or why they do an initial edit but do not become ongoing contributor.
  • Create a list of good ideas on meta. (Action point: share this list with the list of attendees of the discussion).
  • Introduce a “Panic button”: “here you can get help.”
  • Provide a way for new users to give feedback on how they have been treated.
  • Encourage new users to communicate with each other about their experiences.
  • Improve the (welcome/warning) templates to make them look less impersonal.
  • Provide a safe space for new users, such as a Draft namespace.
  • Make the edit button more inviting: for example, don’t show a blank page when creating a new article. Boost the confidence of new users.
  • Be humble in the front of expertise of new users who happen to be expert – recognize experts when they come around.
  • Specialist groups: specialist gathers users with expertise around a subject.

by carlosmonterrey at September 04, 2014 08:04 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

Sixty ways to help new editors

Discussion in the Wikimania Discussion Room

Last August, Iolanda Pensa and I had the honor to facilitate a discussion at the Wikimania Discussion Room on the topic of Welcoming and retaining new users. This discussion was set up as a brainstorm session, and was one of the more rewarding experiences I had during Wikimania. In the session we focused on ideas on how we as a community can help new users become and remain involved. I hope that some of the ideas will be inspiring to you!

The round table discussion took place during Wikimania and was self-selected. Everyone was welcome to join, there was no expert panel and there was little preparation. The goal of the discussion was to come up with 30 ways to help new users on Wikimedia projects become and remain involved. We wanted ideas that did not depend on the Wikimedia Foundation or affiliate organizations, or on developers. I’m very glad to be able to say that 60 ways to help new users were shared – no doubt with some overlap, but still remarkable! At the end of the discussion we asked every participant to make a commitment for the coming month on how they would personally implement some of the 60 different methods to help new users.

The ideas brought forward were all over the place. You can find the original list in the discussion notes. In this post I would like to share an abridged list, where some points are merged and clarified.

I encourage every experienced user to browse through this list and explore the different ideas. Similarly to the participants in the discussion, please commit to one of them in the coming weeks – if you want, you can do so publicly by posting a comment on this blog post. Your commitment might serve as encouragement for others to do the same!

Lodewijk Gelauff, facilitator of the Wikimania Discussion Room and volunteer at Wikimedia Netherlands

Mentorship:

  • Form tandems between experienced editors and newcomers.
  • Mentorship space/program. Contributors may be matched to new users based on similarity of interests (enwiki).

Welcoming:

  • Send a welcome message, with a direct contact link. For example: “Hello, I’m Trizek, please contact me if you need assistance.”
  • Use Snuggle – A tool for experienced editors to welcome good faith newcomers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Snuggle
  • Join the “Teahouse” (enwiki; hewiki).
  • Find people who are willing and able to communicate in a friendly way – and new users should be channeled to them (where do I land after I created an account?)
  • It’s better to help five new users in a personalized way than to post 50 welcoming templates.
  • Organize/attend in-person meetups to help address the gap between ideal (“anyone can edit”) and reality (“it is tough”) – meetings that can be attended by new users.
  • Invite the new users to meetups – meet the contributors – put faces behind username.

Do not bite the newcomers:

  • Slow down the medium experienced users (~6 months of experience) that are overly enthusiastic and tend to ‘bite’ new users.
  • Rewrite messages into apologies (“we’re sorry if we didn’t understand what you intended; we had to revert your change”).
  • When interacting with new users, be more friendly.
  • Take “don’t bite the newbies” more seriously. Introduce (or enforce) a punishment for biting new users.
  • French Wikipedia had a message with a shark – “you have bitten a newbie” (no more biting newbies at fr.wp now, template has been deleted…)

Less is more:

  • Write shorter and clearer help and welcome messages with clear links. Help pages with 20 links are too much – a two sentence help message is better.
  • Make less use of templates in communication with new users; take more personalized action.
  • Reduce the number of rules (Ignore all rules at enwiki)

Give assignments:

  • Deliberately seeding small errors that are easy to fix. Or perhaps make them on sandbox/non article space? (Wikipedia adventure does that).
  • Organize a Wikipedia semi-regular scavenger hunt. Ask people to fulfill simple tasks, like “fix a dead link,” “fix a grammatical error” and reward them for that.
  • Provide a list of articles that new users can try to edit. (supposedly there’s an example of this on enwiki).
  • Give new users a list of assignments to do. Work queues that people can pick from, based on their interests.
  • Encourage people to play “The wikipedia adventure” (enwiki), or “the tourist bus” (cawiki).
  • More ways to contribute that are safe and have less drama – not only article creation/editing, like images, geo location, more fact checking, cleanup, checking external dead links.
  • Encourage micro editing thorough games.
  • Invite new users to advance in the stages of micro games.

Better training:

  • Produce and share a video of a new user seeing a mistake, going in and fixing it.
  • Set up some form of online training course on how to be a Wikipedia contributor.
  • Train experienced Wikipedians on how to welcome to new users.
  • Training in social manners/communication for experienced users and admins!

Better communication/documentation:

  • Reinforce that edits are live and seen by the whole world, use that as an intrinsic motivation.
  • Make visible how much training in editing someone has. Positive reinforcement for users investing – a progress bar to show how experienced they are.
  • Create a link page from which there is a an organised link tree to ALL possible instructions that the new user never finds.
  • Explain the basic principles of Wikipedia / Wikimedia projects in a friendly and understandable manner even if it is obvious to you and create instruction pages where these are explained in an understandable way.
  • Re-educate experienced users to use more friendly communication.
  • Give credit for being friendly to newbies, recognition, (gamification here?).
  • Encourage the use of discussion pages.
  • we need a much better manual and shorter summarized rule book (each rule is 8 pages long) – every rule should be a single sentence – and then put all nutshells in one page (“WP:Plain and simple” on enwiki?)
  • New editors want to create articles – and the feedback comes after weeks – speed up the process of checking new articles and giving feedback and improve the quality of the feedback.

Positive reinforcement:

  • Giving new editors recognition or a reward or a badge to show that they have learned something – a barnstar that you get for learning something – and each time you learn something the barnstar gets bigger. (example from enwiki) This may expand to include recognition of experienced users who complete education in nonviolent/civil communication or provide hospitality to new users.
  • Show after a week or month how many people saw the change and were positively affected.
  • Monthly emails showing how many people read the page you edited and used your knowledge, with a message like “the change you have made helped this amount of people.”
  • Give a “thumbs up” even for little things – Use ‘Thank you’ button right next to editor contributions.
  • Give recognition of outstanding edits (example dewiki: three level “barnstar type”).
  • Community post “achievement of the week” (enwiki).
  • Choose “contributor of the month” or “of the year” by the community.
  • More motivating messages – we are used to saying “work not good” but don’t get exercise giving out more positive messages.

Other:

  • Consider the expectations and the clash between expectations and reality – find ways to measure why new contributors leave.
  • Be sensitive to the different types of problems in different wiki’s – because every community has a different size and history, they work differently.
  • Recruit new people (events, museums, schools…)
  • Place a banner on Wikipedia with an explicit invitation to edit: if you want to edit follow this link and people are invited to meetup (But this should be displayed as part of the software, not an advertisement).
  • Do better research on why people do not edit even if they want or why they do an initial edit but do not become ongoing contributor.
  • Create a list of good ideas on meta. (Action point: share this list with the list of attendees of the discussion).
  • Introduce a “Panic button”: “here you can get help.”
  • Provide a way for new users to give feedback on how they have been treated.
  • Encourage new users to communicate with each other about their experiences.
  • Improve the (welcome/warning) templates to make them look less impersonal.
  • Provide a safe space for new users, such as a Draft namespace.
  • Make the edit button more inviting: for example, don’t show a blank page when creating a new article. Boost the confidence of new users.
  • Be humble in the front of expertise of new users who happen to be expert – recognize experts when they come around.
  • Specialist groups: specialist gathers users with expertise around a subject.

by carlosmonterrey at September 04, 2014 08:04 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Foundation

Wikimedia Germany

Wikimedia:Woche 27/2014

Hier kommt die 27. Ausgabe der Wikimedia:Woche im Jahr 2014. Dieser frühherbstliche Newsletter wird gemeinschaftlich von Projektaktiven und Wikimedia Deutschland erstellt, serviert in kleinen Häppchen Aktuelles und Brisantes aus der internationalen Wikimedia-Welt und möchte zum Weiterlesen anregen.

Die Woche entsteht in einem offenen Redaktionsprozess: Wenn du über die internationalen Kanäle auf Links oder Storys stößt, die für die lokale Arbeit der deutschsprachigen Community von Relevanz sein können, hinterlasse einen Hinweis in der nächsten Woche! Du kannst entweder selber einen Teaser-Text vorbereiten, oder einfach nur einen Link setzen, den wir dann vor Versand mit einer Zusammenfassung dekorieren.

Wenn du Wünsche zur Woche im Allgemeinen oder Anregungen zur Abdeckung spezieller Themen hast, melde dich gerne in den Kommentaren. Allen Mitwirkenden gilt hier wie gewohnt besonderer Dank.

Viel Vergnügen beim Lesen!

Wikimedia:Woche 27/2014

Frühere Ausgaben sind archiviert unter:

Die Liste der Beitragenden kann der Versionsgeschichte der jeweiligen Ausgabe im Archiv in der Wikipedia entnommen werden.

Foundation und Organisationen

Wikimedia Belgien anerkannt

Das Board of Trustees der Wikimedia Foundation hat auf seinem Treffen auf der Wikimania die Anerkennung von Wikimedia Belgien als Chapter beschlossen.

Affiliations Committee such neue Mitglieder

Das Affiliations Committee, zuständig für die Anerkennung von neuen Wikimedia-Organisationen und -Gruppen, sucht neue Mitglieder.

Wikimedia Foundation mit neuem Evaluationsportal

Das Evaluations-Team der Wikimedia Foundation hat die eigenen Seiten auf Meta komplett überarbeitet. Edward Gálvez berichtet darüber im Wikimedia-Blog.

Projekte und Initiativen

Wiki Loves Monuments 2014

Die nächste Runde des jährlich stattfindenden Fotowettbewerbes hat wieder begonnen! Neben Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz nehmen auch noch 34 weitere Länder an dem Wettbewerb teil, unter anderem zum ersten Mal der Irak, Libanon, die palästinensischen Gebiete, Pakistan und Irland.

Neue IEG-Förderrunde der Wikimedia Foundation

Die Wikimedia Foundation hat eine neue Runde für die „Individual Engagement“-Förderung ausgeschrieben, Anträge (in einem Kostenrahmen von 200 bis 30.000 US-Dollar) können zwischen dem 1. und 30. September eingereicht werden. Auch nicht-englischsprachige Förderanträge sind möglich. Des Weiteren finden am 16., 25. und 28. Google-Hangouts zur Information von Interessierten statt.

Flickr mit 12 Millionen neuen Bilder des Internet Archive

Der Amerikaner Kalev Leetaru lädt derzeit 12 Millionen digitalisierte, gemeinfreie Bilder des Internet Archive auf Flickr. Derzeit gibt es Pläne Teile der Sammlung auch auf Wikimedia Commons zu übertragen.

Wiki-Dialog zum Zedler-Preis 2015 gestartet

Der Wiki-Dialog zur Vorbereitung des Zedler-Preises 2015 hat am 4. September begonnen.

Wikidata-Daten für Histropedia

Jens Ohlig berichtet im WMDE-Blog (auf Englisch) über den Nutzen von Wikidata-Daten für externe Projekte, wie beispielsweise Histropedia. Histropedia ermöglicht es Zeitleisten für bestimmte Ereignisse und Objekte zu erstellen.

Technik

Mobiles Hochladen wird ausgeschaltet

Wie das „Mobile“-Team der Wikimedia Foundation berichtet, wird das mobile Hochladen (über den Browser) von Dateien auf Wikimedia Commons vorerst abgeschaltet. Die bisher eingegangenen Dateien waren 70-80 Urheberrechtsverletzungen, Testbilder oder Selfies. Die Initiative zum Abschalten kommt vor allem seitens der Community auf Wikimedia Commons, die sich über den massiven Arbeits- und Wartungsaufwand beklagt hatte.

Presse und Websites

„Editiermarathon“ für Frauen

Das Neue Deutschland berichtet über einen „Editiermarathon“ (Edit-a-thon) für Frauen, der in den Räumen von Wikimedia Deutschland stattfand.

Ethnographische Studie der Wikipedia

Dariusz Jemielniak, unter anderem Autor in der englisch- und polnischsprachigen Wikipedia sowie FDC-Mitglied, hat eine ethnographische Studie zur Wikipedia im Allgemeinen herausgegeben. Motherboard.com gibt einen Einblick in das Werk.

Studie zu Kommunikation und Emotion in Wikipedia

In einem wissenschaftlichen Paper stellen Wissenschaftler aus Spanien, Deutschland, Qatar und USA ihre Ergebnisse zur Studie: “Emotions under Discussion: Gender, Status and Communication in Online Collaboration” vor. Darin geht es vorrangig um Wikipedia.

Termine

4.09.: Metrics Meeting der Wikimedia Foundation

Am Donnerstag (4.9., also am Erscheinungstag der Wikimedia:Woche) findet um 20 Uhr das monatliche Metrics Meeting der Wikimedia Foundation statt. Dort stellen Mitarbeitende und Geschäftsführerin der Wikimedia Foundation ihre aktuelle Arbeit vor und präsentieren nächste Schritte oder regen zur Diskussion an. Interessierte können sich entweder per Livestream dazu schalten, im IRC Fragen stellen oder später das Video ansehen. Themen werden unter anderem auch MediaViewer und Single User Login (SUL) sein.

12./13.09.: OERde14 – Konferenz zu Freien Bildungsmaterialien in Berlin

Am 12. und 13. September ist es soweit: Zum zweiten Mal findet die größte Konferenz zum Thema “Freie Bildungsmaterialien” in den Räumen der Urania in Berlin statt. Themen der Konferenz sind unter anderem bildungspolitische Fragen zu OER, Erfahrungen aus dem Ausland sowie didaktische Implikationen. Gefördert wird die Konferenz von der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung, Schirmherrin ist die Deutsche UNESCO Kommission. Die Anmeldung zur Teilnahme ist noch bis zum 07. September möglich. Mehr Informationen zur OERde14 gibt es unter:

15.09.: Freies Wissen in der Wissenschaft?! Veranstaltung im Rahmen der Tour der MS Wissenschaft in Wien

Im Rahmen der Tour des Ausstellungsschiffes MS Wissenschaft laden Wikimedia Österreich, Wikimedia Deutschland, Wikimedia Schweiz, die Open Knowledge Foundation Österreich und die Open Knowledge Foundation Deutschland gemeinsam zur Diskussion über (mehr) Offenheit in der Wissenschaft ein. Die Veranstaltung beginnt um 19:00 Uhr.

by Cornelius Kibelka at September 04, 2014 03:39 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Germany

Wikimedia Sweden

Varför behövs just dina bilder i Wiki Loves Monuments?

Tidigare postat på bloggen för Wiki Loves Monuments Sverige.

Vart år är vi på Wikimedia Sverige ute och talar med folk om Wiki Loves Monuments och förklarar varför det är viktigt att de deltar. Ofta får vi samma frågor och kommentarer från personer som är osäkra på om eller hur de kan delta. Nedan hoppas vi på att besvara några av de vanligaste frågorna samt ge några tips på hur du får mer ut av byggnader som redan fotograferats samt hur du gör det lättare för andra användare att hitta och använda dina bilder.

Jag är inte världens bästa fotograf. Vill Commons verkligen ha mina bilder?

Ja, det vill vi verkligen! Syftet med de flesta av fototävlingarna är inte bara att hylla våra bästa fotografer, även om det också är viktigt. Ännu viktigare för Wikimediarörelsen är att få fler personer involverade i att bidra och fritt dela med sig av användbara bilder. Vi vill göra folk medvetna om att de kan välja att låta sina bilder ligga på en hylla, eller en hårddisk, och samla damm, eller att publicera under en fri licens så att de blir tillgängliga och kan användas av alla var som helst i världen.

En 'vanlig' bild

En ‘vanlig’ bild av en byggnad. Skoklosterslott666.JPG av Marcinek [CC BY-SA 2.5]

Wikipedia har redan fotografier av alla intressanta byggnader i mitt område. Varför vill ni ha fler?

En enskild bild av en byggnad kan ge en generell överbild, men inte mycket mer. Vårt mål på Commons är att samla så många informativa och utbildande byggnader som möjligt; för att ge många valmöjligheter till den som behöver en bild av byggnaden och för att fånga de olika aspekterna av byggnaden. Så om du ser att din favorit byggnad redan har en högkvalitativ bild på Wikipedia där du inte skulle kunna ta en bättre själv, oroa dig inte. Istället för att ladda upp en dubblett av lägre kvalitet, koncentrera dig på något lite annorlunda. Exempelvis kan något av följande vara av intresse:

  • Fotografier från olika vinklar eller med olika perspektiv
  • Byggnaden i sin omgivande miljö
  • Bilder från baksidan och sidorna (helst dem alla)
  • Arkitektoniska detaljer, både stora drag och små detaljer
  • Bilder från insidan (i de fall man kan få tillstånd för detta)
  • Tillhörande byggnader, om sådana finns (t.ex. gårdsbyggnader, annex etc.)
  • Byggnaden under olika ljusförhållanden eller vid olika tider på året
  • Byggnaden i användning, exempelvis under en högtid eller när den är öppen för besökare
  • Äldre halvhistoriska bilder, under förutsättningen att du själv tog bilden
  • Artistiska bilder
Byggnaden från en ny vinkel

Byggnaden från en ny vinkel. Skokloster fasad 2013b.jpg av Holger.Ellgaard [CC BY-SA 3.0]

Hur är det med ”tråkiga” eller icke-anmärkningsvärda byggnader?

Commons är ett brett arkiv för informativa och utbildande bilder och andra mediefiler. Commons applicerar inte några av Wikipedias ”relevanskriterier” på sina bilder. De kräver dock att alla foton åtminstone är potentiellt användbara för informativa och utbildande syften.

För att försäkra dig om att dina bilder är användbara för andra, ange alltid detaljerad information om vad du fotograferat. En omärkt och till synes slumpmässig bild av ett radhus löper risken att raderas av en administratör på Commons då den inte betraktas som användbar ur ett pedagogiskt syfte; men samma bild kan vara av avsevärt syfte om du angivit:

  • en förklarande titel (t.ex. ”Detalj från ett av radhusen i kvarteret Canada, Lidingö kommun”),
  • en informativ beskrivning (t.ex. ”Detaljbild av en av portarna i kvarteret Canada, Lidingö. Radhusen i kvarteret Canada från 1908 omtalas ibland som Sveriges första radhus.”).
  • (helst) en koordinat.
Detaljbilder

Detaljbild. Skokloster_fasad_2013c.jpg av Holger.Ellgaard [CC BY-SA 3.0]

Undvik problem på plats

  • Visa hänsyn och tänk på andra fotografer, och andra på platsen.
  • Var extra hänsynsfull om byggnaden du vill fotografera är en privat bostad. Fortsätt inte att fotografera om den som bor där ber dig att sluta. Förklara gärna varför du tar en bild av just deras hus.
  • Om du fotograferar inomhus, sluta direkt om någon ber dig. Vissa platser förbjuder fotografering inomhus, men andra kan detta tillåtas om du får tillstånd.
  • Gör inte intrång på privat egendom. I Sverige är det dock helt ok att ta bilder av privat ägda byggnader från en allmän plats så som gatan. I vissa länder gäller andra begränsningar: se Commons:Freedom of panorama.
  • Försök att undvika att ta bilder där individuella människor får en framträdande plats. På livliga platser, t.ex. vid turistattraktioner, kan det dock vara svårt att helt undvika folk. Om inget annat alternativ finns, ta med en större grupp människor eller individer om de inte utgör en betydande del av bilden.
  • Där det är möjligt försök att undvika att fotografera fordon, speciellt registreringsskyltar.

Upphovsrätt

Ladda inte upp fotografier av affischer, anslagstavlor, skyltar eller moderna väggmålningar, eller något annat med text eller en tvådimensionell bild som kan vara upphovsrättsligt skyddad. Detta gäller även om texten eller bilden finns på en offentlig plats. Även om alla andra tar bilder av denna typen av texter och bilder innebär detta inte att bilden kommer att accepteras på Commons. Tillräckligt gamla väggmålningar i exempelvis kyrkor är ok och likaså om skylten enbart utgör en liten del av bilden.

by André Costa at September 04, 2014 03:30 PM (feed) Subscribe to Wikimedia Sweden